Central Escarpment Council

This BLOG is maintained by the Council and its Areas – Burlington, Credit Hills, Mississauga, North Waterloo, Oakville, Wellington & Yellow Briar

Welcome to the BLOG

Welcome to Scouting for another year.  This blog is maintained for Central Escarpment Council and its’ Areas.  Using the categories to the right you can quickly find information of interest to you.  For contact information see the ‘About & Contact Us’ link above.  You can return to this home page at any time by clicking on ‘Home’ above.  Great Scouting!

Important Web Shortcuts in CEC

If you’re looking for HELP on www.scouts.ca or www.myscouts.ca you may find it useful to visit the Zendesk knowledge base. It’s linked directly on the myscouts.ca site, but you can reference it any time at https://myscouts.zendesk.com/forums .

CJ17 CEC Contingent Crest Orders

CEC is producing a crest for CJ’17.

A big congratulations to Callista Pitman, from 27th Guelph for the winning design.

We will be offering the crests in different border colours to represent each of the 7 areas.

Red – Burlington
Green – Credit Hills
Blue – Mississauga
Brown – North Waterloo
White – Oakville
Orange – Wellington
Yellow – Yellow Briar

The maximum crest cost will be $4.50, but will likely be lower once we know the final numbers.

If you would like to order some, please visit this page: https://form.jotform.ca/71364828714260

Because of the short timelines; all orders must be complete by June 1 so they can be ordered on June 2. I will arrange delivery once they have arrived.

If you are ordering some and are NOT attending CJ, please put that in the notes section so that I can prioritize crest delivery.

2017 Easiest Fundraiser(s) of the Year!

For almost 20 years, the Wellington Gilwell Club have volunteered for the Rotary Ribfest at Riverside Park.  And in the past two years we’ve also volunteered for the Rotary Canada Day Celebration, and the Guelph Multicultural Festival. Sign-up links are at the bottom of this post.

In return for doing parking and garbage at these events, our club received significant funds.  We are proud to share that our club has recently used the fundraising profits to support Wellington Scouting through:

  • Acquiring new equipment – such as the new Area Kub Kar Track
  • Providing the Gilwell equipment trailer to support Quartermasters at camps and events
  • Sponsored programs – like the 2015 Wellington Area BBQ
  • Supporting local youth reach their fundraising goals for 2015 World Jamboree in Japan ($2,500 in earnings, just from the Multicultural Festival and Canada Day).
  • In 2016, Groups shared in over $7,000 in earnings, some of which went to the 2016 Jamboree in Finland.

Invitation for Scout Groups to Share in the Profits

 The Wellington Gilwell Club forecasts that over $11,000 in fundraising profits will be available to share this year.  Each group that participates will receive a full share of the profits, based on the hours their group volunteers for each event.

You may choose as many shifts as you wish – with a minimum of 2 shifts per group in order to participate in the profit share.  (To minimize the paperwork).   The profit share will will probably be calculated at somewhere just above $6.00/hour.

Who Can Volunteer for Your Group?

  • Adults (leaders, parents, friends, family)
  • Youth – Scout age and up (they will be paired with an adult volunteer for garbage duty)
  • Choose your shifts (most are 3 or 4 hours long)
  • Choose your duty – either parking (directing vehicles) or garbage (advising how to sort, recycle)
  • We provide the training, and safety equipment, and good spirits
  • Youth volunteer hours can count toward high school requirements

You Pick the Opportunities In 2017 

Multi Cultural FestivalMulticultural Festival    Friday June 9th to Sunday June 11th 2017 – Shifts are Friday, Sat, Sun

 

 

Canada DayRotary Canada Day         Friday July 1st, 2017 – Shifts are all day Saturday

 

 

Sign up coming          Rotary Ribfest                   Thursday Aug 24th to Sun Aug 27th, 2017 – Shifts are Thursday (the concert), Friday, Sat, Sun

Everton Summer Camp 2017 Presents – Medieval Times

Memorable Summer Camp Experiences Start Here!

Dates

  • Cub Camp – July 9 – 14, 2017
  • ACE Camp – July 16 – 21, 2017
  • Scout Camp – July 16 – 21, 2017

What will youth experience at Everton Summer Camp?

  • Hiking
  • Crafts
  • Archery
  • Swimming
  • Wood lore
  • Sports
  • Crayfishing in the Eramosa River
  • Open fire cook-out
  • Adirondack sleepout
  • Wide games
  • Campfires
  • Medieval Themed activities
  • And many more fun activities!!

More about Camp Everton

Camp Everton is a warm Scouting environment in which youth can grow and develop using both the skills that they bring to and learn at camp. Situated along the beautiful Eramosa River, on approximately 185 acres, Camp Everton is filled with breathtaking scenery, small limestone caves and majestic cliffs. Camp Everton is safe and clean and provides an excellent place for youth to enjoy their summer! Camp Everton is a fully equipped facility with washrooms, full kitchen, and sleeping quarters. The main lodge, affectionately termed “The Cub Barn” is a fully converted barn that provides a wonderfully rustic and unique experience for any youth.

Cub Camp

Cub Camp is open to all youth ages 8-11, including White Tail Beaver Scouts. We would also welcome youth who are 7 years of age born in 2009.
 Campers will stay in the Cub Barn, participate in theme activities and have the opportunity to sleep out in an Adirondack. Campers will rotate through program activities and have the chance to challenge themselves to complete their own quest!

ACE Camp

ACE (Advanced Cubbing Experience) Camp is open to youth ages 10-11 (third year Cub Scouts).
 This is a dynamic and unique experience that will prepare youth for the adventures that they will meet in Scouts. ACE Campers will stay in tents and have the opportunity to stay in Adirondacks as well. They will learn many outdoor camping skills such as outdoor cooking, pioneering, and survival safety.

Scout Camp

Scout Camp is open to youth ages 11 – 14.
 Campers will set up their full campsites in the Scout forest, preparing all meals at their sites. Scouts will have the opportunity to practice skills and challenge themselves as they encounter new situations at Camp.

Cost

Scouts Canada Members: $350 per week (plus HST)

Cost for Non Members: $30 per week (additional)

Contact E-mail: summercamp@scouter.ca

Registration

Registration is now open – use the on-line registration form

If you experience any difficulty using the online registration form, please contact cec@scouter.ca

Contact: Heather Bender – summercamp@scouter.ca

CEC Summer Nights 2017

Join us for a Summer Night at one of our CEC Scout Camps

Who: Active Scouts and their Immediate Family

Where:

Camp Everton

Wednesday

July 12, 2017

Blue Springs Scout Reserve

Wednesday

July 26, 2017

Camp Manitou

Wednesday

August 23, 2017

Time(s): About 7:00PM until dusk 9:00PM /dark 9:30P

Events: Arrive / Greet >> Hike / Activity(s) >> Campfire >> Mug Up* >> STEM star/ moon viewing

* Bring own mug (We’re leave no trace) & refreshment

Cost: Free (Yes, No charge)

Let us know you are coming @ cec_marketing@scouter.ca Info only NO REPLY(S)

Weather Permiting

Embrace the Chaos – a Flux in Time Fall Camp

From the program team of Embrace the Chaos – a Flux in Time

Camp registrations and Offers of Intent to Participate are now open! Please contact us at camps.npema@gmail.com with your information, questions or any concerns.

Cheques may be mailed to our group – address will be sent with receipt of your intent form completed. No cash please! We’re working to accept online payments as we speak!

The link to register your group’s intent to participant can be found here: https://goo.gl/forms/NJzeBTqTX8HitArj1

Offers of Service (OOS) registration forms: https://goo.gl/forms/MEmKWxjQ7gIxZuCu1

We’re always looking for more program staff, and site services and fire/police vents/rovers.

Volunteer Opportunity – Group Commissioner 1st Bolton

Dear Scouters,

Please see the attached opportunity for Group Commissioner of 1st Bolton Scout Group. If there is someone who you feel would be a good fit for this position please forward this onto them.

If interested, please contact myself at jway@scouts.ca before Sunday May 21, 2017

Thank you

Justin Way

Job description –HERE

Everton Summer Camps 2017 – Now Hiring for Multiple Positions

Are you looking for a summer job? Do you love camping, working in the outdoors, and helping to deliver a fun-filled summer camp program for Cub and Scout aged youth?  Everton Summer Camps is now accepting applications for positions including Program Director, Head Cook, Kitchen Assistants, Lifeguards and Camp Counsellors.  If you are interested in applying for any of these positions, please see the below job descriptions for full details:

Program Director

Head Cook

Kitchen Assistant

Lifeguard

Camp Counsellor

Interested applicants should submit a resume and completed application (found here) to Camp Director Heather Bender (summercamp@scouter.ca) no later than May 28th, 2017.

We are also looking for volunteers interested in helping out with the first three weeks of camp (July 2nd-7th, July 9th-14th, and July 16th-21st). If you are available for any of these weeks and would be interested in volunteering, please send an email to summercamp@scouter.ca with your availability.  Volunteers would be working as Camp Counsellors (see job description for more information).

Scouting Life: Woodbadge II on the Canadian Path

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/05/woodbadge-ii-canadian-path/ by Jeff Schroeder

Wood Badge training in Canada is broken down into two parts. Wood Badge I focuses on basic program facilitation knowledge and is usually accomplished through a form of eLearning. As you might imagine, Wood Badge II is “applied Wood Badge I.” Wood Badge II takes the skills learned in Wood Badge I and applies them against practical situations, with particular attention to basic outdoor and Volunteer-support skills.

Completing Wood Badge I has been a requirement for all Scouters, and it continues to be so. Wood Badge I was relatively easy to achieve because one could accomplish it on their own time through the eLearning package provided by Scouts Canada. Wood Badge II, however, required much more time and commitment: Scouters had to set aside a full week, or consecutive weekends, in order to complete the training which was done at Scouting retreats. As you can imagine, this meant that the number of Scouters who had accomplished Wood Badge I was very high, but by comparison those who had achieved Wood Badge II was quite low.

With the implementation of The Canadian Path, Scouts Canada has revised Wood Badge II training to remove the barriers that the time commitment of the previous training model created. Rather than requiring trainees to book time away from their busy schedules, families, and Scouting Groups to complete the training, the new model maps Wood Badge II over The Canadian Path. This makes it a self-directed program that can be completed at the trainee’s convenience, while continuing to offer the opportunity to learn “applied Wood Badge I skills.”

The new Wood Badge II training uses 26 Scouter Development Cards that are available in the Wood Badge II Guide for Section Scouters that is available through the link at the end of this article. Each card has been designed by Scouts Canada to focus on and provide resources for a specific skill relating to Outdoor Skills, Program Facilitation, and Volunteer Support. The basic anatomy of each card includes a description, learning objectives, Plan-Do-Review guidelines, safety notes, online resources, and tips and tricks. Scouters use these Development Cards for self-directed learning using the following eight steps:

  1. Choose a Wood Badge II Support Scouter
  2. Review the Scouter Development Cards and conduct a self-assessment
  3. Select any number of Scouter Development Cards
  4. Review the Learning Objectives of the cards you have chosen with your Support Scouter
  5. Create and implement a plan over the next program cycle
  6. Review your progress with your Support Scouter at the end of the program cycle
  7. Repeat steps 4 to 6 until you have completed all the Scouter Development Cards
  8. Submit your Wood Badge II application to your Council

As you can see, the new model of training is entirely self directed, although you will want to find a good Support Scouter to work with through your training. And important thing to keep in mind, however, is that the Support Scouter is not responsible for your training. They can provide feedback, are available to discuss and review your activities, and provide resources you may need to complete your Wood Badge II training. But the training is self-directed: it is your responsibility to complete everything necessary. That said, Support Scouters must meet Scouts Canada’s Volunteer screening requirements and must have completed their Wood Badge I training as well. So you can’t just pick anyone. It is also an excellent idea to have a good working relationship with whomever you pick as your Support Scouter. You should also make sure that your choice for Support Scouter has the time to work with you on the Wood Badge II program.

With the introduction of The Canadian Path, our Youth are expected, with support, to become more self-directed and take on more leadership roles as a result. But it shouldn’t stop at our Youth. Scouters should also be expected to take responsibility for their own learning and training as well. The updated Wood Badge II training reflects The Canadian Path to allow you to work with a Support Scouter and complete your training on your own time. Scouts Canada is excited about these changes, as it offers a greater opportunity for Scouters to obtain their Wood Badge II certification. For more detailed information regarding the new Wood Badge II training, you can Scouts.ca/WB2 and download guides both for Section Scouters and Support Scouters. Or you can contact our National Learning & Development Team Lead, Ross Benton, at ross.benton@scouts.ca.

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Scouting Life: 26th Halifax Scouts Win Engineering Design Competition

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/05/26th-halifax-scouts-win-engineering-design-competition/ by Jeff Schroeder

This year, the 26th Halifax Scout Troop in Nova Scotia took part in the Junior High Engineering Design Competition hosted by Engineering Nova Scotia. It was a fun and challenging afternoon, and it presented those who took part with an opportunity to be creative around current issues of climate change, and to design and engineer a safer and more resilient environment to live in. And I’m very pleased to announce that through the hard work and creative spirit of our Scouts, a team from the 26th took home first prize for their design.

The event took place at the Central Halifax Library on the 25th of March 2017, and it was a city-wide competition open to junior high aged youth. The teams that entered were given only vague details about the parameters of their design projects prior to the competition. Everyone knew that the theme of the competition had something to do with climate change, but that’s about it. Each team was given the parameters of what they were to design and engineer at the start of the competition, and everyone had an hour to complete their design.

The main idea was to build something (what that was wasn’t specified, it could be anything) that would prevent toxic waste from spilling out of a container during an earthquake. The toxic waste was represented during the competition by coloured water, and the container was represented by a cup. The teams were not allowed to cover the top of the cup as part of their design, and the top of the copy had to be at least 10cm above the surface of the table. Teams were also provided with a variety of materials they could incorporate into their design: elastic bands, BBQ skewers, tape, string, popsicle sticks, and pipe cleaners.  Each item provided was priced, and the teams were limited to a total budget of $150.  For instance, a popsicle stick would set the teams back $10, so you had to be “wise in the use of resources.”

26th Halifax Scout Group

At the end of the allotted hour, the designs were tested using an earthquake simulator provided by the organizers, and the designs were judged on their ability to keep the “toxic waste” from spilling, as well as taking into account the overall cost of the design and the team’s presentation (sales pitch) of their design.

As a Scouter, I was proud of our Scouts.  They understood the problem, worked together well as a team, and got a functional design working in an hour, under budget. In relation to the overall turnout for the event, this in and of itself was an accomplishment: most other teams weren’t able to complete their designs.

Our Scouts created a design that came out as a tripod – something our Scouts have built in real life at camps – so in many ways Scouting gave them the basis for a good STEM design. Our Scouts have also had some prior experience with design and build. As a Troop we have made really good use of the “Let’s Talk Science” outreach program offered by Dalhousie University (letstalkscience.ca). So pioneering, combined with some design/build experiences as well as some fine teamwork served our Scouts well. In addition to this, Ryan Greene, who was one of the Scouts on the team, is a National Youth Spokesperson. He did a great job “selling” the design to the judges. Yet another place where participation in Scouting helped.

26th Halifax Scout Group

We all had a great time and a ton of fun. Through the great work of our Scouts we received $100 towards our CJ’17 fund for winning. I’d encourage everyone in Nova Scotia to consider checking out future events hosted by Engineering Nova Scotia. They host events during March, which is National Engineering Month. Maybe we’ll see you next year at the Design Competition!

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