This BLOG is maintained by the Council and its Areas – Burlington, Credit Hills, Mississauga, North Waterloo, Oakville, Wellington & Yellow Briar

Canadian Path

CECuboree Planning Meeting

It may be fall, but we are already looking forward to June and CECuboree 2018!

Calling all Cub Scouters and Howlers. If you attended CECuboree last year and/or are interested in this year come on out to give input about what you want to see at CECuboree 2018.

We went through all the cub suggestions for a theme and the choice was clear……..”Nintendo” will be the theme for CECuboree 2018. Mario and the gang were the most requested, from Smash Bros. to Mario Cart.

Come on out for our Howlers Council meeting:
Blue Springs Scout Reserve
Saturday, Oct 28th
2-4pm.
Main Lodge Parking lot
14045 6th Line Nassagawaya
Milton, On

We will be helping out with the facility with a clean and hike as well as a great chance to review and brainstorm ideas to make CECuboree 2018 even better than last year.

Mark your calendars for CECuboree 2018, June 8-10.

 

Questions can be directed to contact@cecuboree.scouter.ca

Snow Wars: Episode 2018 – Winter Camp – Feb 2nd thru 4th 2018 – Barber Scout Camp

CAMP REGISTRATION IS LIMITED TO 300 YOUTH AND LEADERS. Registration the past several years has either hit 300 or come very close. Register early!

Please register no later than January 12th, 2018 with your estimated attendance numbers to receive the camp package and schedule.

Please see the flyer by clicking -HERE- for more details.

 

Or visit us at https://www.facebook.com/WELLYnSAUGAcamporee for way more info!

Online registration available now by clicking -HERE- (you may, optionally, pay by PayPal or credit card).

6th Annual 2017 Scout Permit Weekend

Back by popular demand, Mississauga and Wellington Areas again present the Skills and Permits Camp. This year dates are November 3rd thru 5th at Camp Everton. Please read the flyer referenced below and register ASAP. We have seen 300+ participants attend previously.

Knife-Stove-Fire-Ax-SawOur team of Scouters have joined forces to help your Troop members earn all four permits; knife, stove & lantern, match & fire and axe & saw. For any new Scouters this is a great way for you to increase your knowledge of these skills. Sessions with small groups of people and multiple trainers will be run for each permit. Sessions on basic pioneering knots and lashings will also be offered.

More Trainers (and Offer of Service assistance) always welcome and needed! Any active, registered Resource Scouter, Venturer Scout and Rover Scout is Welcome!! Please email the camp registrar with the skill you would be happy to assist with TODAY!!!

Click -HERE- to print the flyer and paper registration form!

Click -HERE- to go to the online registration form (payment via PayPal/Credit card optional afterwards).

FLEX Training – Registration NOW OPEN!

*Please note that the Youth Development Weekend scheduled for the October 14-15 weekend has been postponed due to low registrations. There are plans in the works to run it at some point in the future, however no dates have yet been determined. We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused.*

When: Sunday, October 15th, 2017 – 8:30am to 4:00pm
Where: Camp Manitou (7484 Twiss Road, Milton, Ontario) – pick-up and drop-off will be at the main parking lot

The Central Escarpment Council Youth Network is hosting a new UPDATED FLEX Training Course for all Cub Scouts! FLEX is a for-youth, by-youth leadership development course designed for Cub-aged youth. Throughout the course, youth will have the opportunity to participate in hands-on and engaging activities that will help to build problem solving, teamwork, effective communication, and conflict resolution skills.

Early Bird Registration Fee: $20 (if received before September 1st)
Regular Registration Fee: $25

Please note that due to the timing of the course, if we are unable to achieve minimum registrations by September 1st, we will be unable to run the course.

If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact Alexander Court (alex.court@scouts.ca).

Outdoor Adventure Skills Workshop – Registration NOW OPEN!

BUILD YOUR OWN ADVENTURE AT THE OAS WORKSHOP

*Please note that the Youth Development Weekend scheduled for the October 14-15 weekend has been postponed due to low registrations. There are plans in the works to run it at some point in the future, however no dates have yet been determined. We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused.*

The Central Escarpment Council Youth Network is hosting its first ever Outdoor Adventure Skills Workshop! This workshop will focus on the OAS – Scoutcraft which was the popular choice in our survey earlier this year (future workshops will focus on each of the other Outdoor Adventure Skills).

When: Saturday, October 14th, 2017 – drop in anytime between 9am and 4pm!
Where: Camp Manitou (7484 Twiss Road, Milton, Ontario) – all activities will be taking place around McLaughlin Lodge, please walk in from the main parking lot

Early Bird Registration Fee: $10 (if received before September 1st)
Regular Registration Fee: $15

Youth members from Beavers up to Rovers are invited to visit the workshop anytime between 9am and 4pm and can take part in a variety of activities such as orienteering, shelter building, lashings, fire lighting and more! This is a self-directed program so all participants are free to travel from activity to activity, and can participate in as many or as few as they’d like. The workshop is designed to allow individual youth to set their own personal goals and decide which skills and knowledge they’d like to gain.

There will be lots of activity stations set up around the event site that will offer opportunities to learn hands on! Some of the skills the workshop will be focusing on include:
 Knots and Lashings
 Making Camp Gadgets
 Camp Hygiene and Cleanliness
 Outdoors Safety
 Shelter Building
 Nature Identification
 Fire Lighting
 Camp Cooking
 Orienteering
 Trail Safety

The event planners are currently looking for Scouters and Youth members to help plan and run these exciting activities as skill mentors for the youth participants. If you have any questions, or want to get involved in helping with the workshop, please contact Alexander Court (alex.court@scouts.ca).

Thanking our Volunteers as part of the Review Cycle

As the weekly meetings wind down, please take a few moments as part of the Review Cycle of Plan-Do-Review to thank our volunteers through Scouts Canada’s Thanks system.

Why?

  1. It takes a special type of person to volunteer, and we can never thank them enough.
  2. It’s very easy to thank them.  You can do it in less than a minute through either the www.scouts.ca/thanks website, or through myscouts.ca.
  3. These individual citations count towards helping them be recognized for Scouts Canada’s other Outstanding Service Awards.

Anyone can hit the Thanks button and recognize a Scouts Canada Volunteer – Youth, Parents, or other Scouters.  If you are logged into myscouts.ca and can access their record (for example, they are in your section or a child organization you have access to), you can add the commendation directly again their account, speeding up the approval process.

The Thanks system is geared towards recognizing Scouts Canada members who are in a volunteer role.  If you have a Beaver, Cub, Scout, Venturer or Rover who is doing great things as a Program Participant, talk to you Section Scouter or Group Commissioner on how you can best recognize their efforts.

 

Have any questions?  Contact the CEC Recognition team through cec_recognition@scouter.ca

 

Albert Fuchigami
Central Escarpment Council Support Team

Scouting Life: Woodbadge II on the Canadian Path

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/05/woodbadge-ii-canadian-path/ by Jeff Schroeder

Wood Badge training in Canada is broken down into two parts. Wood Badge I focuses on basic program facilitation knowledge and is usually accomplished through a form of eLearning. As you might imagine, Wood Badge II is “applied Wood Badge I.” Wood Badge II takes the skills learned in Wood Badge I and applies them against practical situations, with particular attention to basic outdoor and Volunteer-support skills.

Completing Wood Badge I has been a requirement for all Scouters, and it continues to be so. Wood Badge I was relatively easy to achieve because one could accomplish it on their own time through the eLearning package provided by Scouts Canada. Wood Badge II, however, required much more time and commitment: Scouters had to set aside a full week, or consecutive weekends, in order to complete the training which was done at Scouting retreats. As you can imagine, this meant that the number of Scouters who had accomplished Wood Badge I was very high, but by comparison those who had achieved Wood Badge II was quite low.

With the implementation of The Canadian Path, Scouts Canada has revised Wood Badge II training to remove the barriers that the time commitment of the previous training model created. Rather than requiring trainees to book time away from their busy schedules, families, and Scouting Groups to complete the training, the new model maps Wood Badge II over The Canadian Path. This makes it a self-directed program that can be completed at the trainee’s convenience, while continuing to offer the opportunity to learn “applied Wood Badge I skills.”

The new Wood Badge II training uses 26 Scouter Development Cards that are available in the Wood Badge II Guide for Section Scouters that is available through the link at the end of this article. Each card has been designed by Scouts Canada to focus on and provide resources for a specific skill relating to Outdoor Skills, Program Facilitation, and Volunteer Support. The basic anatomy of each card includes a description, learning objectives, Plan-Do-Review guidelines, safety notes, online resources, and tips and tricks. Scouters use these Development Cards for self-directed learning using the following eight steps:

  1. Choose a Wood Badge II Support Scouter
  2. Review the Scouter Development Cards and conduct a self-assessment
  3. Select any number of Scouter Development Cards
  4. Review the Learning Objectives of the cards you have chosen with your Support Scouter
  5. Create and implement a plan over the next program cycle
  6. Review your progress with your Support Scouter at the end of the program cycle
  7. Repeat steps 4 to 6 until you have completed all the Scouter Development Cards
  8. Submit your Wood Badge II application to your Council

As you can see, the new model of training is entirely self directed, although you will want to find a good Support Scouter to work with through your training. And important thing to keep in mind, however, is that the Support Scouter is not responsible for your training. They can provide feedback, are available to discuss and review your activities, and provide resources you may need to complete your Wood Badge II training. But the training is self-directed: it is your responsibility to complete everything necessary. That said, Support Scouters must meet Scouts Canada’s Volunteer screening requirements and must have completed their Wood Badge I training as well. So you can’t just pick anyone. It is also an excellent idea to have a good working relationship with whomever you pick as your Support Scouter. You should also make sure that your choice for Support Scouter has the time to work with you on the Wood Badge II program.

With the introduction of The Canadian Path, our Youth are expected, with support, to become more self-directed and take on more leadership roles as a result. But it shouldn’t stop at our Youth. Scouters should also be expected to take responsibility for their own learning and training as well. The updated Wood Badge II training reflects The Canadian Path to allow you to work with a Support Scouter and complete your training on your own time. Scouts Canada is excited about these changes, as it offers a greater opportunity for Scouters to obtain their Wood Badge II certification. For more detailed information regarding the new Wood Badge II training, you can Scouts.ca/WB2 and download guides both for Section Scouters and Support Scouters. Or you can contact our National Learning & Development Team Lead, Ross Benton, at ross.benton@scouts.ca.

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Scouting Life: 26th Halifax Scouts Win Engineering Design Competition

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/05/26th-halifax-scouts-win-engineering-design-competition/ by Jeff Schroeder

This year, the 26th Halifax Scout Troop in Nova Scotia took part in the Junior High Engineering Design Competition hosted by Engineering Nova Scotia. It was a fun and challenging afternoon, and it presented those who took part with an opportunity to be creative around current issues of climate change, and to design and engineer a safer and more resilient environment to live in. And I’m very pleased to announce that through the hard work and creative spirit of our Scouts, a team from the 26th took home first prize for their design.

The event took place at the Central Halifax Library on the 25th of March 2017, and it was a city-wide competition open to junior high aged youth. The teams that entered were given only vague details about the parameters of their design projects prior to the competition. Everyone knew that the theme of the competition had something to do with climate change, but that’s about it. Each team was given the parameters of what they were to design and engineer at the start of the competition, and everyone had an hour to complete their design.

The main idea was to build something (what that was wasn’t specified, it could be anything) that would prevent toxic waste from spilling out of a container during an earthquake. The toxic waste was represented during the competition by coloured water, and the container was represented by a cup. The teams were not allowed to cover the top of the cup as part of their design, and the top of the copy had to be at least 10cm above the surface of the table. Teams were also provided with a variety of materials they could incorporate into their design: elastic bands, BBQ skewers, tape, string, popsicle sticks, and pipe cleaners.  Each item provided was priced, and the teams were limited to a total budget of $150.  For instance, a popsicle stick would set the teams back $10, so you had to be “wise in the use of resources.”

26th Halifax Scout Group

At the end of the allotted hour, the designs were tested using an earthquake simulator provided by the organizers, and the designs were judged on their ability to keep the “toxic waste” from spilling, as well as taking into account the overall cost of the design and the team’s presentation (sales pitch) of their design.

As a Scouter, I was proud of our Scouts.  They understood the problem, worked together well as a team, and got a functional design working in an hour, under budget. In relation to the overall turnout for the event, this in and of itself was an accomplishment: most other teams weren’t able to complete their designs.

Our Scouts created a design that came out as a tripod – something our Scouts have built in real life at camps – so in many ways Scouting gave them the basis for a good STEM design. Our Scouts have also had some prior experience with design and build. As a Troop we have made really good use of the “Let’s Talk Science” outreach program offered by Dalhousie University (letstalkscience.ca). So pioneering, combined with some design/build experiences as well as some fine teamwork served our Scouts well. In addition to this, Ryan Greene, who was one of the Scouts on the team, is a National Youth Spokesperson. He did a great job “selling” the design to the judges. Yet another place where participation in Scouting helped.

26th Halifax Scout Group

We all had a great time and a ton of fun. Through the great work of our Scouts we received $100 towards our CJ’17 fund for winning. I’d encourage everyone in Nova Scotia to consider checking out future events hosted by Engineering Nova Scotia. They host events during March, which is National Engineering Month. Maybe we’ll see you next year at the Design Competition!

The post 26th Halifax Scouts Win Engineering Design Competition appeared first on Scouting Life.

Fill out a Survey for STEM for a chance to Win!

It has been almost 4 years since Scouts Canada’s STEM program was launched at the Canadian Jamboree 2013 in Alberta. Over the past 4 years, the STEM team volunteers and staff have worked hard to create fun and exciting resources and opportunities for Scouting youth: Trail Cards and STEM kits that helps youth better experiment with the natural connections between Scouting and STEM and STEM station at various national and provincial Jamborees.

Now we need our Scouters’ feedback to see how the program is working and what we can do to make it better. Whether they are a STEM guru in their Scouting world, or have never heard of the program before; Whether they have used Scouts Canada’s STEM resources, or are hearing about them for the first time, we want to hear from them. And we want to ask you to promote the survey so that we can get as many responses as possible. Please distribute this link to the Scouters you work with and ask them to share their thoughts and feedback:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/P6XFNV5

As an added bonus, if they fill out the survey before May 7th, they will be entered into a draw to win a $50 Scout shop gift card. So there’s really no reason not to do it!

Scouting Life: Growth is about more youth experiencing Scouting

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/03/growth-youth-experiencing-scouting/

75th Hamilton Scout Group

Behind every great Scouting Group is a number of dedicated Volunteers who understand the important role that Scouting plays in the lives of youth. These Volunteers make it possible for more youth to participate in great, safe Scouting adventures. This holds true for the Volunteers of the 75th Hamilton Scout Group. Over the last Scouting Year, the Volunteers were able to grow this Group from 32 youth to 49 – that’s a growth of almost 54%!

We didn’t intent to grow. It just happened. We believe it’s because of what we set our minds to do with the Group every single week.

Gino Sferrazza, Co-Commissioner

Upon speaking with Co-Commissioner Gino Sferrazza, it became clear this is no ordinary Group. The Volunteers of the 75th Hamilton Scout Group work hard at engaging the youth through the full integration of the Canadian Path. “One of the biggest points of pride for us is that we have both feet on the Path,” said Gino. “We made a conscious decision that was what we were going to do to engage the youth. It wasn’t long after that the word spread around and people walked into our meetings interested in participating. We didn’t intend to grow. It just happened. We believe it’s because of what we set our minds to do with the Group every single week.”

What I may think as a 52 year old may not be cool for a 12 or 14 year old.

Gino made a point to highlight that the Scouting program is for the youth. The Volunteers put a conscious effort in making sure the youth are having fun. “For us,” said Gino, “the Canadian Path just makes sense. Everyone seems to be having fun. Are we perfect? No. But we’re headed in the right direction.” These Volunteers inspire the youth to take charge and fail in a safe environment. The youth have so much fun, they don’t want to go home at the end of the night! “We don’t look at the Canadian Path as a new program,” said Gino. “The Canadian Path is going back to what Lord Baden-Powell had originally intended for this program. It’s important that the kids take part in the planning, the execution and the review of each activity. What I may think as a 52-year-old may not be cool for a 12 or 14-year-old.”

75th Hamilton Scout Group - Camping

With the youth having so much fun, it came as no surprise to ScoutScene that word of mouth has helped their Group grow. “For us, every week is Bring-A-Friend week. In fact, we encourage the youth to bring their friends. We’ve had a few youth sign up right away after attending one of our weekly meetings.”

The 75th Hamilton Scout Group also understands the value of parent engagement. This Group gets the parents together once a year to meet face-to-face. This is an opportunity for them to showcase all of the great activities their youth are experiencing and involved in. It’s opportunities like this that remind parents of the great things Scouting has to offer.

This Group has not done any extravagant advertising. They have used a flyer here, or a flyer there at the local school and around the neighbourhood. Yet, they have managed to grow their membership significantly. Through their efforts focusing solely on the youth – ensuring that they have a say and are having fun – Scouting truly is an easy sell.

To read other Group Growth articles, visit the Scout Scene Archives.

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