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Important, Messages, Warnings

Scouting Life: Woodbadge II on the Canadian Path

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/05/woodbadge-ii-canadian-path/ by Jeff Schroeder

Wood Badge training in Canada is broken down into two parts. Wood Badge I focuses on basic program facilitation knowledge and is usually accomplished through a form of eLearning. As you might imagine, Wood Badge II is “applied Wood Badge I.” Wood Badge II takes the skills learned in Wood Badge I and applies them against practical situations, with particular attention to basic outdoor and Volunteer-support skills.

Completing Wood Badge I has been a requirement for all Scouters, and it continues to be so. Wood Badge I was relatively easy to achieve because one could accomplish it on their own time through the eLearning package provided by Scouts Canada. Wood Badge II, however, required much more time and commitment: Scouters had to set aside a full week, or consecutive weekends, in order to complete the training which was done at Scouting retreats. As you can imagine, this meant that the number of Scouters who had accomplished Wood Badge I was very high, but by comparison those who had achieved Wood Badge II was quite low.

With the implementation of The Canadian Path, Scouts Canada has revised Wood Badge II training to remove the barriers that the time commitment of the previous training model created. Rather than requiring trainees to book time away from their busy schedules, families, and Scouting Groups to complete the training, the new model maps Wood Badge II over The Canadian Path. This makes it a self-directed program that can be completed at the trainee’s convenience, while continuing to offer the opportunity to learn “applied Wood Badge I skills.”

The new Wood Badge II training uses 26 Scouter Development Cards that are available in the Wood Badge II Guide for Section Scouters that is available through the link at the end of this article. Each card has been designed by Scouts Canada to focus on and provide resources for a specific skill relating to Outdoor Skills, Program Facilitation, and Volunteer Support. The basic anatomy of each card includes a description, learning objectives, Plan-Do-Review guidelines, safety notes, online resources, and tips and tricks. Scouters use these Development Cards for self-directed learning using the following eight steps:

  1. Choose a Wood Badge II Support Scouter
  2. Review the Scouter Development Cards and conduct a self-assessment
  3. Select any number of Scouter Development Cards
  4. Review the Learning Objectives of the cards you have chosen with your Support Scouter
  5. Create and implement a plan over the next program cycle
  6. Review your progress with your Support Scouter at the end of the program cycle
  7. Repeat steps 4 to 6 until you have completed all the Scouter Development Cards
  8. Submit your Wood Badge II application to your Council

As you can see, the new model of training is entirely self directed, although you will want to find a good Support Scouter to work with through your training. And important thing to keep in mind, however, is that the Support Scouter is not responsible for your training. They can provide feedback, are available to discuss and review your activities, and provide resources you may need to complete your Wood Badge II training. But the training is self-directed: it is your responsibility to complete everything necessary. That said, Support Scouters must meet Scouts Canada’s Volunteer screening requirements and must have completed their Wood Badge I training as well. So you can’t just pick anyone. It is also an excellent idea to have a good working relationship with whomever you pick as your Support Scouter. You should also make sure that your choice for Support Scouter has the time to work with you on the Wood Badge II program.

With the introduction of The Canadian Path, our Youth are expected, with support, to become more self-directed and take on more leadership roles as a result. But it shouldn’t stop at our Youth. Scouters should also be expected to take responsibility for their own learning and training as well. The updated Wood Badge II training reflects The Canadian Path to allow you to work with a Support Scouter and complete your training on your own time. Scouts Canada is excited about these changes, as it offers a greater opportunity for Scouters to obtain their Wood Badge II certification. For more detailed information regarding the new Wood Badge II training, you can Scouts.ca/WB2 and download guides both for Section Scouters and Support Scouters. Or you can contact our National Learning & Development Team Lead, Ross Benton, at ross.benton@scouts.ca.

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Scouting Life: Scout Popcorn roadshow!

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/05/scout-popcorn-roadshow/ by Jeff Schroeder

Want some hands-on support when planning your campaign? Not sure how to prepare your Kick-Off? Want to walk through the Popcorn system? Trail’s End and Scouts Canada will be travelling across the country to help you make your Scout Popcorn fundraiser a success! See the locations and dates below. Would you like to register?

Register Here

Are the locations too far from you? We’ll be live streaming the seminars for you to follow along! You can find the links to follow along here.

City Date Location
St John’s, Newfoundland June 5th, 6:30PM-9PM Hampton Inn St John’s – 411 Stavanger Dr, St. John’s, NL A1A 0A1
Halifax, Nova Scotia June 6th, 6:30PM-9PM Hampton Inn Dartmouth – 65 Cromarty Dr, Dartmouth, NS B3B 0G2
Toronto, Ontario June 8th, 6:30PM-9PM Sheraton Parkway Hotel – 9005 Leslie St, Richmond Hill, ON L4B 1B2
Victoria, BC June 10th, 10AM-12PM Marriott Victoria Inner Harbour, 728 Humboldt Street, Victoria, B.C. V8W 3Z5
Vancouver, BC June 11th, 10AM-12PM Sheraton Vancouver Airport – 7551 Westminster Hwy, Richmond, BC V6X 1A3
Calgary, Alberta June 14th, 6:30PM-9PM Sheraton Suits Calgary Eau Claire – 255 Barclay Parade SW, Calgary, AB T2P 5C2
Edmonton, Alberta June 15th, 6:30PM-9PM Sheraton Edmonton South – 7230 Argyll Rd NW, Edmonton, AB T6C 4A6
Regina, Saskatchewan June 16th, 6:30PM-9PM Hilton – 1975 Broad St, Regina, SK S4P 1Y1
Ottawa, Ontario June 17th, 10AM-12PM Scouts Canada National Office – 1345 Baseline Road, Ottawa ON, K2C0A7
London, Ontario June 21st, 6:30PM-9PM Scouts Canada Western Ontario Service Centre – 531 Windermere Rd, London ON

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Scouting Life: To do a Good Turn Every Day…

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/05/to-do-a-good-turn-every-day/ by Jayne Robertson

A recap of the projects and power of Good Turn Week 2017

The first question I am asked in every interview and conversation about Good Turn Week is always “what is a good turn and what does it look like?” To address this query, I find it is easiest to simply point to the projects envisioned and brought to life by the Youth of Scouts Canada during Good Turn Week. Across Canada, from April 29th – May 7th, 2017, these projects not only strived to make the world a better place through small acts of kindness, but creatively and generously made a positive lasting impact on their communities.

Throughout Good Turn Week, Scouting Youth were encouraged to put their heads together and come up with ideas for good turns that would set an example for their communities. The Youth answered this challenge enthusiastically, initiating a range of projects that helped the homeless, the environment, less fortunate youth, and addressed many other issues our society faces.

Since the implementation of the Canadian Path has encouraged Scouters to foster a more youth-led program, many of the Good Turn Week projects were driven by Scouting participants and address what they see as an act of kindness in our modern world. With that in mind, it is awesome to see the generous and compassionate spirits of the Youth reflected in their planning and project choices, some of which were truly remarkable.

One of these fantastic projects was the Scouts’ Knit-a-Thon for those in need, which took place in Mississauga on April 30th. This initiative was created by a 1st Sandalwood Cub Scout who wanted to see her Group knit 100 scarves for people in their community in need of warm winter clothes. This was a unique and exciting project which highlights the growing youth awareness of homelessness and poverty fostered by Good Turn Week’s many events.

Another project that addressed the less fortunate in our communities was the Youth-to-Youth Caring Project, which was constructed by the 215th Strathcona’s Cub pack “A”, and was specifically centred on having the Cubs themselves build care packages to be distributed to less fortunate kids. The Cubs decided which issue they wanted to deal with and child poverty was their number one concern. I had the benefit of working with this Group and I know first hand how enthusiastic the Scouters and Youth were about this project. It was led by the Cubs from beginning to end, and the care packages they constructed will certainly make a difference in the lives of several young people in their city.

Some groups decided to work on helping not just other people, but the four-legged members of their community as well. The 23rd Elsie Roy Scout Group did this by having each section create care packages for their local pet foodbank, Charlie’s Foodbank. Donations included toys, food, and treats for dogs, cats, and other small animals whose humans need a little help to get them the things they need.

Other groups decided to go a different route and look at issues around the environment. One of these events was the Bee Houses for St. Albert. The entire 2nd St. Albert Scout Group implemented this initiative that built bee houses to improve the bee populations in their city and protect their local plant and insect life. It was led by all members of all ages. It was a large project that had all five sections working as a team to design, construct, and place the bee houses around the city.

These are only a few examples of the many Good Turn Week projects that took place across the country. To read about more of these inspiring Good Turn Week events, check out the website at Scouts.ca/goodturnweek, and social media platforms (#goodturnweek).

To really get a grasp on just how amazing the Good Turn Week events were this year, I would recommend that you look at the Scouts Canada Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook pages to see photographs and commentary on the projects. As Youth work on projects like tree planting and food drives, the smiles on the faces of Beavers, Cubs, and Scouts are bright and contagious.

Many of the good turns you can see include work with Scout Trees, our initiative to raise money and plant trees in deforested areas. The participation through Scout Trees is doubly powerful, as Youth can tackle tree planting and Good Turn Week at once, highlighting both projects in one big good turn towards the environment.

While the local Scout groups worked on individual projects, on a national level Scouts Canada worked tirelessly to promote these projects, emphasizing the fabulous job all the Youth and volunteers have done to make their good turns a success.  Youth Spokespeople helped with the promotions by giving interviews and working with programs to advertise the campaign, while creating their own regional good turn week initiatives.

Overall, Scouts Canada has really gone out of their way to make Good Turn Week 2017 something spectacular, spreading awareness on both a local and national stage. Through each act of kindness, the event instilled in Youth the drive to follow in the footsteps of Baden-Powell, who believed that we should all try to make the world a better place, one-step at a time.

The post To do a Good Turn Every Day… appeared first on Scouting Life.

Call for Nominations – Scouts Canada Board of Governors

Fellow Scouters

I am writing on behalf of the National Nominating Committee to invite nominations for the National Board of Governors for 2017-2018.

We are seeking nominations for the positions of Chair and Vice-Chair – Strategic.  We are also potentially looking for new members (called Member-at-Large) for the Board of Governors, including at least one youth member.

The Chair of the Board shall act as chair of all meetings of the Board and all meetings of Scouts Canada’s Voting Members. Working closely with the National Key 3, the Chair plays an important leadership role as an Officer of the organization.

The Vice Chair of the Board – Strategic is responsible for the development of the strategic plan of the organization, and assists the Chair of the Board, and chairs the Board should the Chair of the Board be unable, for any reason, to carry out the responsibilities of that office.

Members-at-Large contribute to the overall effectiveness of the Board through participating actively in all aspects of Board business.  As defined in the Bylaw, the Board of Governors is responsible for ensuring that the organization adheres to its Mission and Principles and has a strong strategic direction to guide its activities.  The Board ensures that appropriate policies and procedures are in place to ensure appropriate fiscal and risk management. In addition, the Board ensures that an appropriate management team is in place to direct and oversee the activities of the organization.

For the at-large positions, the Board of Governors would especially welcome nominations of individuals with experience of expertise in one of the following areas:  development/fundraising, strategic human resources, property and asset management, law, and executive leadership.

Board members are expected to attend a minimum of four weekend meetings per year.  Board members also participate in committee work between board meetings.

For the above positions, you may submit your name for consideration or recommend others.  Each submission must be accompanied by a CV/resume and a written confirmation from the individual acknowledging that they are willing to serve and that they have an understanding of the position.  All submissions must be sent to Steve Kent, Chair of the National Nominating Committee (skent@scouts.ca) by midnight PST, June 30, 2017.

If you have any questions or concerns, please get in touch with me any time.  I can be reached at skent@scouts.ca.  Thanks!

Yours in Scouting

Steve

STEVE KENT

Past Chair – Board of Governors  |  Chair – National Nominating Committee  |  Canadian Head of Contingent – 24th World Scout Jamboree – 2019  |  Scouts Canada

Fill out a Survey for STEM for a chance to Win!

It has been almost 4 years since Scouts Canada’s STEM program was launched at the Canadian Jamboree 2013 in Alberta. Over the past 4 years, the STEM team volunteers and staff have worked hard to create fun and exciting resources and opportunities for Scouting youth: Trail Cards and STEM kits that helps youth better experiment with the natural connections between Scouting and STEM and STEM station at various national and provincial Jamborees.

Now we need our Scouters’ feedback to see how the program is working and what we can do to make it better. Whether they are a STEM guru in their Scouting world, or have never heard of the program before; Whether they have used Scouts Canada’s STEM resources, or are hearing about them for the first time, we want to hear from them. And we want to ask you to promote the survey so that we can get as many responses as possible. Please distribute this link to the Scouters you work with and ask them to share their thoughts and feedback:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/P6XFNV5

As an added bonus, if they fill out the survey before May 7th, they will be entered into a draw to win a $50 Scout shop gift card. So there’s really no reason not to do it!

Note to all Scouters re: MyScouts

There has been an issue with “myscouts” and some Scouters might find they have been made inactive. Scouts Canada is aware of the issue and are in the process of correcting the problem. Further updates will follow.

2017 Central Escarpment Council Election – Call for Nominations

Scouts Canada is a corporation created by an Act of Parliament. Each Council has a say in the governance processes of the corporation through three voting members who are elected pursuant to Policy 1014. All Scouts Canada members born before December 31, 2003, are eligible to serve as Voting Members and to vote for their Council’s Voting Members.

The Voting Members represent Councils at the Scouts Canada Annual General Meeting and vote on a series of governance resolutions, including the election of the Board of Governors. They also represent their Councils at Special Meetings, if one is called during their term. Council Voting Members are elected for a one-year term. One of the three Voting Member positions is reserved for a youth member, but it should be noted that all three Voting Members from a Council may be youth members. By-law No. 2 defines youth members as those who are under the age of 27 years on September 1, 2017.

The 2017 Annual General Meeting will be held on November 18, 2017, in Toronto. Councils may ask their Voting Members to attend by webcast, video conference, or teleconference. Online voting facilities are made available for this purpose.

Candidate Eligibility

A Candidate must:

  • be an Ordinary Member and be registered and active within the Council that he or she proposes to represent;
  • be nominated in writing by 5 Ordinary Members who are registered with the same Council as the Candidate;
  • have attained the age of 14 years in the calendar year in which the election is conducted.

Filing a Nomination

Interested members may download a Nomination Form here. Nominations must be submitted to the Chief Elections Officer via e-mail (elections@scouts.ca) no later than 5:00 PM EST, May 22, 2017. A Candidate may make a Candidate Statement of no more than 750 words for distribution to the Ordinary Members. A Candidate Statement may contain external links and must be capable of being reproduced in a digital file format which when printed will not exceed one 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper.

Voting Process

Policy 1014 governs the voting process. Information about the voting process, timelines and frequently asked questions can be found here. The voting uses the single transferable vote system. Voters rank candidates in order of preference. This process is explained in more detail here. All Ordinary Members born prior to December 31, 2003 may may participate in electing their Council’s Voting Representatives. Voting will be online through MyScouts.ca; please ensure that your MyScouts account has been setup. Detailed instructions as to how to vote will be sent out closer to the date of the election period.

There are two main parts to this year’s process:

  • Call for Nominations is open from April 22, 2017 until May 22, 2017.
  • Voting opens on June 1, 2017 and closes on June 22, 2017.

The Chief Elections Officer will announce results within seven days after voting closes.

Have questions?

For more information, please contact your Deputy Elections Officer David Wiebe elections@scouter.ca or Chief Elections Officer Chris Pike at elections@scouts.ca.

Red Cross – Good Turn Week Event

For more than 100 years, youth in Scouting have committed themselves to do a good turn for their neighbours each day. It is a reflection of Scouts Canada’s vision – Canadian youth making a meaningful contribution to creating a better world – and it is something that Scouting youth take quite seriously.

As part of the 8th Annual Good Turn Week (GTW) initiative the Canadian Red Cross has joined Scouts Canada in offering a series of FREE first aid workshops for youth aged 9 to 16 years of age. These workshops are taking place in four major city centres: Ottawa, Vancouver, Halifax and Mississauga. These workshops have been developed to provide meaningful first aid education experiences and to increase resiliency in local communities.

As a practice, first aid should prevent further suffering, protect life, and promote recovery. The workshop will explore both prevention and response concepts, focusing on increasing the confidence of the learners and inspiring action when they are presented with an emergency situation and the opportunity to help someone in need.

Date of the event:  Saturday, April 29 and Sunday, April 30

Time:  There will be two sessions each day:  9 – 12 and 1 – 4,

LocationMississauga Red Cross Office, 5700 Cancross Court, Mississauga, ON L5R 3E9, Peel Training Room
Capacity: 20 participants

How do I register?

Here is the link to register (Look for the workshops located in Mississauga)

https://www.eventbrite.ca/o/scouts-canada-amp-the-canadian-red-cross-13470159668

Scouting Life: Getting Involved in Scouting and What It Means to Be on the Canadian Path

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://bit.ly/2mAM8jt

2007 was Scouts Canada’s centennial year, and it was also the year I was a newly invested Cub in a Pack of 20 other youth in Toronto. Fast forward to the present and now I have a few roles associated with my name – Youth Commissioner, youth spokesperson, camp staff member – and it’s all been an amazing opportunity. This Scouting year is also the year of the Canadian Path’s official launch, which follows an approach that I have been grateful for since I was a child – even though I had not  heard of the Canadian Path back then. My journey within Scouting has been relatively long (I mean, I’m only 18) so when people ask me how I got to where I am now I don’t know what to say, but I do know that the Canadian Path has been with me every step of the way.

I became more involved in Scouts Canada from my role as a youth participant when I learned that there were opportunities available for me to do more. Many people don’t realize that there is a huge team running Scouts Canada from behind the scenes. We often just see the youth participants – the Beavers with their hats, the Cubs running around the gym, the Scouts with all their badges and their adult Scouters. Behind all that are Group Committee meetings, Area teams conducting support visits, Councils and National working together to ensure the best for the organization.

There are several opportunities for youth to take on leadership roles within the organization. Cubs and Scouts can aid younger sections as Scouters, youth can become involved in their Area by becoming a member of their Area Youth Network, and Councils frequently look for youth to join their teams. To those who find working in the media more interesting, Scouts Canada recruits youth spokespeople to aid in social media campaigns, be interviewed by the media and write for them (oh hey!).

Of course, more doors tend to open the older you are. In 2016 the minimum age requirement to apply to be a youth spokesperson was 11 years old, and most Area, Council and National youth networks consists of older Scouts, Venturers and Rovers. It is remarkable that there is even an opportunity for youth involvement.

For myself, the more I got involved the more I wanted to do, and the more I grew. I went from Cub to Scout to Venturer to Scouter to working alongside the Area and the Council teams. I also became more confident in myself, more independent and responsible. Every step of the way I was encouraged and helped by both youth and adult members.

As time went on, I increasingly realised the importance of youth involvement in every level of this organization. After all, we pride ourselves in having quality program for youth, and who knows youth better than the youth themselves?

I increasingly realised the importance of youth involvement in every level of this organization.

Gina Kim

In 2014 I had just become an Area Youth Commissioner and that also happened to be the year the Canadian Path started to roll out. The Canadian Path isn’t a whole new program but a revitalization of what the program was meant to be. Sure, the Canadian Path comes with a new set of badges, requirements and changes in structure but that ensures that the needs and wants of the youth are being met. Older Scouters talk about a time when they were younger and could plan and participate in activities on their own, without their Scouters doing everything for them or their parents dictating their every move. However, somewhere along the way those core values in Scouting – leadership, independence, teamwork and problem solving – were lost. The point of the Canadian Path is to find them once again. The Canadian Path was based on a greater need for youth involvement and to return to the core of Scouting.

If the youth can plan, do and review their own meetings, activities and events, they are on the Path.

If the youth can be leaders and teach the younger sections, their own sections and even their Scouters, they are on the Path.

If the youth can work with other youth and adults to discuss their own opinions, they are on the Path.

The Canadian Path allows youth to make their own decisions, gain responsibility, learn from their past actions and from each other. This allows youth to become engaged with the program, become independent, become more confident and participate in the program they want to be in, not the program that the Scouters want.

Oftentimes, I hear remarks from parents and Scouters that the youth aren’t old enough to make decisions. Sure, a Beaver can’t exactly plan a one week snowshoeing trip, but they sure can decide if they want to go on a winter camp. A Cub may not be able to completely plan their camp meals on their own, but with a little guidance from the Howlers and their Scouters it can be done. Being “little” doesn’t exempt anyone from all responsibilities. Just because they’re young doesn’t mean they can’t become more independent, make smart decisions, have opinions, learn important life skills and have fun all at the same time.

Just because they’re young doesn’t mean they can’t become more independent, make smart decisions, have opinions, learn important life skills and have fun all at the same time.

Gina Kim

As an Area Youth Commissioner at that time, it was heartbreaking to think there were Scouters that were against the Canadian Path. The Path consists of four main components – youth-led, plan-do-review, adventure, and SPICES. To be against the Path was essentially being against a program in which the youth could make decisions, do what they wanted, learn from mistakes, go on adventures and grow in different ways. Being against the Path meant to me that people thought that I wasn’t worthy of the roles and responsibilities I held, the qualities that I have gained and the experiences I had. But I knew that I was capable and the other youth were too.

To be on the Canadian Path is to know, acknowledge, and act upon the fact that youth should be involved every step of the way. The youth are the future of the world, what good does it do to hold them back from all their potential?

One might say I’ve done a lot within Scouts Canada but I cannot express enough that I have been extremely fortunate because everyone I have worked with valued youth participation and leadership. Without these values that the Canadian Path contains, there would not have been an opportunity for people like myself to become more involved in Scouting and truly experience what this organization really is.

The post Getting Involved in Scouting and What It Means to Be on the Canadian Path appeared first on Scouting Life.

Scouting Life: Join Scouts Canada EnvironMentality Fundraising Initiative

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://bit.ly/2meSzYn

environmentality-ol

For the better part of ten years, Scouts Canada and Sears Canada have joined forced to promote Scouts Canada’s environmental initiatives and youth programming through in-store fundraising events. Previously known as “Eco-Scouts”, EnvironMentality is Scouts Canada’s new and improved environmental stewardship program. For a two-week period, Sears Canada allows Groups to promote Scouting and fundraise in local Sears stores through a point of sale program that benefits Scouts Canada’s environmental initiatives.

This year, from April 13th-26th cashiers at Sears stores across Canada will be asking customers to make a $1 donation to support Scouts Canada. These funds will help us to deliver our environmental programs to Groups across the country.

Sears Canada is highly conscious of their environmental impact and they are excited to aid Scouts in their fundraising endeavors to deliver quality and well-rounded outdoor programming. Groups can raise funds for items like: Scoutrees, shore line cleanups, community gardening and clean-up costs, and environmental education programs.

On Saturday, April 15th and Saturday April 22nd, Sears is inviting local Groups from across Canada into their stores to set up informative booths and displays. At the same time, local Groups will have the opportunity to collect donations from Sears’ customers, which will be allocated towards environmental initiatives. Scouts should use this time as an opportunity to showcase Scouting activities and programs, promote the organization and fundraise.

Each Group is responsible for coordinating the day and time they would like to fundraise at their local Sears store. Scouting Groups will be allowed to take the money they raise with them, ensuring the majority of the funds go directly to the Group’s environmental initiatives.

Whether you chose to raise funds by hosting a BBQ and selling hot dogs and hamburgers, or plan to sell baked goods, it’s sure to be a success – so start planning today!

For more information on Scouts Canada’s EnvironMentality and Sears partnership, contact environmentality@scouts.ca.