This BLOG is maintained by the Council and its Areas – Burlington, Credit Hills, Mississauga, North Waterloo, Oakville, Wellington & Yellow Briar

Important, Messages, Warnings

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CEC is looking for some GREAT Stories!

Attention CEC!

The Central Escarpment Council is full of many great stories! And we want to hear them all!

We are currently looking for both youth and adult members to provide content for our blog, Area websites, Facebook pages, as well as our soon to be released Council Newsletter.

As one of the largest Councils in Canada we have lots of active members having exciting adventures! So lets share them with the world.

It could be an awesome camp adventure. Perhaps a cool STEM activity. Maybe a fantastic place you went. The possibilities are limitless and we want to hear them all!

Just write you adventure, success, or ideas down and send them to ken.broad@scouts.ca

Remember to include photos when possible.

So lets be #Scoutproud and tell the world!

YiS

Ken Broad
DCC Communications
Central Escarpment Council

Respect In Sports Training Deadline is Soon!

Greeting Scouters,

This is a gentle reminder that the Respect in Sport Training MUST be completed by August 31, 2017. This applies to all Scouting Volunteers. If it is not showing on your training by this date your will not be renewed for the upcoming Scouting year. The training can be accessed via the David Huestis Learning Centre on your MyScouts profile. See attached for FAQs on the training as well as accessing it. I would highly recommend that you make plans to complete this requirement as soon as possible.

Click -HERE- for FAQ sheet

Yours in Scouting!

Scouting Life: Staying Safe while on a Hike

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/07/staying-safe-hike/ by Jeff Schroeder

Hiking can be both a rigorous and rewarding experience. You can challenge yourself to climb to new heights, experience changing terrain, and witness the hidden beauties that await over mountain peaks, along coastlines, or tucked away in the forest. Risks are inevitable when exploring these remote and rugged terrains; however, by taking the right safety precautions, you will find the last step of your trail scratch-free.

Growing up as a Scout, much of my knowledge has come from personal experience, or from the experiences of Scouters and other youth. My hiking experience as a Scout has taught me about the top nine risks you are most likely to face while heading off on the trail, and how to ensure they do not interfere with your adventure.

1. Dehydration

Dehydration is a common risk for hikers. Depending on the duration of your hike, it is important to consider the amount of water you will need and the sources available to you.

Most trails are established near streams, rivers, or lakes; however, if you plan on going out for more than a few hours, you should ensure that these resources are close to the trail and permit water extraction. It is also important to carry filtering equipment with you to remain safely hydrated.

Once you have established your sources of water for the journey, remember to drink early and often. Hydropacks offer an easy to carry and drink format that usually carries around 2 L of water. These are ideal for those who want to avoid having to refill their bottles halfway through a hike, or constantly having to stop to hydrate.

Personally, when hiking, I find myself getting thirsty and dehydrated because I forget to stop for breaks while enjoying the views and wildlife. Having a hydropack straw readily available to drink from allows me to constantly keep hydrated without having to change the way I am enjoying the journey

2. Wildlife

Wildlife is one of the biggest attractions while on a hike. Stories of seeing large mammals, intricate foliage and even insects are fun to share with friends and family upon return, but it is important to remain cautious.

You often hear that making noise is important for allowing animals to be aware of your presence. This is best done by having constant conversation with whoever you are with. If travelling by yourself, thinking out loud is often the best way to maintain enough noise to warn animals. Yes, this means talking to yourself, but what better place to do this than when no one is around?

If you do encounter animals while hiking, speaking softly and moving slowly is most ideal for smaller creatures, but for larger mammals such as bears and moose, it is extremely important to remain still and wait for them to move away from the area.  If they intend on staying longer and are blocking your path, slowly turn back while keeping an eye on the animal.

3. Plants

Plants can also pose a threat to humans, whether it be poison ivy or thistles, they can all impact the enjoyment of your hike. Knowing what these plants look like and remaining on the trail are the best ways to avoid unwanted encounters with both these plants and other types of wildlife.

4. Bugs

Bugs are often overlooked in the wildlife department but insects, mosquitoes and flies can be just as dangerous as plants and animals. Mosquitoes are a nuisance everywhere; however, in the backcountry they can be worse if you are travelling through a moist lowland region. Bug spray may not be effective in these areas, and if that is the case, wearing longer sleeves and pants will keep your skin out of their reach.

5. Know your abilities

Know your physical abilities when going hiking, especially when enjoying the outdoors with a group of friends with different skill levels. Taking the time to review the trail together is extremely important in ensuring everyone is comfortable with the exertion that is required. Your review should include the changes in elevation throughout the journey, and the overall distances of the trail.

Often one of the biggest mistakes made in this review is only looking at the net elevation of the trail. This is a dangerous mistake to make because if the trail starts in a valley and goes over a mountain into another valley, the net elevation will be nil; however, there could be a 2000ft climb in the middle that is overlooked.

6. Dress the part

Dress the part when going for a hike. Proactively wearing layers, appropriate footwear in the right materials will ensure a smooth journey. Hikes can take you from cool shaded forests to dry sun-exposed ridges within a few kilometres. Or, from a 30 degree summer day to a damp single digit reading within a couple hours, so it is important to ensure you’re equipped for all types of weather.

Personally, I like to start off with a t-shirt, followed by a thin breathable long-sleeved layer, topped with a thicker layer and a waterproof layer. I can quickly take these layers off as I go, and put them back on as it cools down.

A common complaint of hiking is blisters. Proper footwear, starting with your socks is the best way to minimize these little guys. Wool socks that allow feet to breathe will keep moisture off your feet and keep the blister environment to a minimum.  Often, I wear two pairs of socks, a thin tighter layer underneath and thicker layer on top (both wool). Hiking, walking or running in new shoes is battle you do not want to face, so if you are investing in new shoes, wear them around your house and when you are training for your hike.

7. Hiking alone? Tell someone

Hiking alone may bring you the spiritual, calm and quiet side of nature, but it does come with added risks. It is important to let someone know your plans by telling them where you are going, when you are leaving, when you will return and when you have returned. That way if they do not receive a call within a couple hours of your estimated time of arrival, they can notify local emergency crews that you could possibly be injured or lost in the area.

8. Be prepared

Being underprepared should never be an issue for a Scout but this must not be overlooked. In the event of getting lost, taking longer on the trail or getting caught in bad weather, it is important to have enough materials to survive. Always pack more than you need, include lightweight snacks, a comprehensive first aid kit, extra warm clothing, matches, and technological independent equipment for directional help, like paper maps and compasses.

9. Enjoy Yourself

Don’t forget to enjoy yourself! Spend an extra few minutes taking in the view or watching a spider spin his web. Cater your planning to your situation and lifestyle, so you can ensure it doesn’t interfere with your enjoyment; and make the safety measures a part of the regular enjoyable routine.

The post Staying Safe while on a Hike appeared first on Scouting Life.

2017 CEC Elections – Results

In accordance with Section 1014 of BP&P, Central Escarpment Council, Scouts Canada has to elect three (3) voting representatives for the Scouts Canada Annual Meeting; two (2) Voting Members at Large and one (1) Youth Voting Member.

In the event that the Deputy Elections Officer does not receive three or more valid nominations, at least one of which is for a youth, for the available positions, the Deputy Elections Officer shall inform the Chief Elections Officer that a vacancy exists for the position for which insufficient valid nominations have been received.

Upon being informed that a vacancy exists, and if he or she is satisfied that the notice of election provisions of this Policy have been complied with, the Chief Elections Officer shall appoint the following to fill the vacancies

  • Council Youth Commissioner (Deanna Di Vitto)
  • Council Commissioner (David Frederick)
  • The position shall remain vacant until the following year’s election.

For more information, please contact your Deputy Elections Officer or the Scouts Canada Chief Elections Officer Chris Pike cpike@scouts.ca

For Central Escarpment Council, the Deputy Elections Officer is David Wiebe and can be reached at cec_elections@scouts.ca

Scouting Life: Bug Bites and Stings

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/06/bug-bites-stings/ by Jayne Robertson

Scouts and Scouters like to be able to identify wildlife big and small when on adventures, but bugs can sometimes be more than simply annoying – they can pose real risks to our health and wellbeing. There are a number of bugs we might encounter that are hazardous, and it’s important to know how to avoid them.

Mosquitoes are all too familiar to Canadians. Mosquitoes can be more than simply aggravating. They can also carry West Nile virus, and too many bites can cause a dangerous allergic reaction. Wear long sleeves and bug repellant to deter mosquitoes when they’re out, especially around dusk.

Head Lice are tiny, tawny wingless insects that make their homes on people’s heads, living off human blood. Avoid head lice by not sharing hats or pillows. Keep your head apart from your friends’ – a little space when taking a selfie can make a big difference! Head lice will not go away without treatment, so visit a pharmacy for a special shampoo if you get lice.

Leeches usually aren’t dangerous, but they can carry disease. Leeches are usually found in warm, shallow, swampy water – which is just the habitat for all kinds of pathogens. A harmless-seeming bite can pose a risk. Remove leeches using a flat, blunt object (like the back of a knife) and then clean any wounds thoroughly.

Bees are found throughout Canada, and they play an important role in pollinating plants. Watch out for bees when you’re around flowers. If stung, clean the sting and remove the stinger with tweezers. Apply a cold compress. Some people are allergic to bees; an EpiPen could be a true lifesaver.

Ticks are tiny bugs that live off the blood of mammals and birds. Ticks are typically found in grassy, wooded areas or along shorelines and in parks – all the places Scouts like to go! To feed, ticks stick their heads into the skin of a host’s body and can remain there up to five days drinking blood. Ticks are known for spreading disease, like Lyme disease. If you have a tick, remove it carefully and deliberately with tweezers. To learn more, check out the safety tip all about ticks.

Wasps are stinging, flying insects (like bees), and you need to watch out for them. Hornets are part of the wasp family. If stung, clean the sting. Apply a cold compress. Some people are allergic to stings, and should use an EpiPen to prevent a life-threatening allergic shock

Spiders, though not insects, are often considered pests – even though they prey on insects that can be far more annoying, and even more dangerous. Spiders in Canada rarely bite, and they do not convey disease. Black widow spiders – which have a red hourglass marking on the stomach – are rare but present in Canada, and they are venomous. If bitten, remain calm. Apply an ice pack and seek medical attention. You can learn more about spiders in Canada at healthycanadians.gc.ca.

The post Bug Bites and Stings appeared first on Scouting Life.

Scouting Life: Does Lyme Disease Tick You Off? Me too!

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/06/lyme-disease-tick-off/ by Jeff Schroeder

Read here for prevention and treatment information

This year, as part of your preparations for summer adventures, make sure your Group includes a review of tick bite prevention, and takes the time to discuss Lyme disease. Ticks are a serious issue! Since we spend so much time outdoors on our adventures, there’s a good chance that we will be in areas where ticks live. Ticks can be found all across Canada, and their populations are becoming increasingly infected with bacteria called Borellia bergdorferi, which is what causes Lyme disease. And the ticks that can carry the disease are tiny — about the size of a poppy seed!

Here are a few tips that will keep you bite-free this summer:

  1. Wear boots so that you can tuck your pants into them. This will prevent ticks from climbing up your legs. For added protection you can spray whatever footwear you’re wearing with a 0.5% permethrin insecticide once a month.
  2. Spritz your clothes with the same permethrin spray. Remember though, that these clothes should be laundered separately — the spray can come off in the wash and mix with other clothing and you don’t want it on your everyday clothes, especially your underwear!
  3. Use a 20 to 30 percent DEET repellant on exposed skin. Look for one that has an EPA registration number, which means that there is information available on its effectiveness against ticks.
  4. Once you are home from your adventure, make sure that you wash the clothes you took with you in hot water, and then tumble dry on high heat for 60 minutes. The heat will kill any ticks that happen to be hanging out on your clothing. Don’t just throw your clothes into the hamper as any ticks on them could potentially cause problems for you or others in your household later.

Ticks especially enjoy grassy wooded areas and shorelines, so be extra cautious when taking your Group on a summer hike or a canoe trip.

If you are bitten by a tick, don’t panic! Not all ticks carry Lyme disease and it can take up to 36 hours for any bacterial infection to transfer. However, you will want to deal with the situation as quickly as possible. Here are the steps you need to know in order to remove them:

  1. Pointed Tweezers: You’ll want to have a pair of these in your kit. Household tweezers (which have flat ends) are less effective because ticks are tiny, and there are increased chances of tearing the tick.
  2. Disinfect the Area: Use rubbing alcohol to disinfect the tick-bite.
  3. Grab the Tick: Using a pointed tweezer, you should be able to grab the tick’s head or grab it directly above the head.
  4. Pull Out Tick: Once you’ve firmly grabbed the tick’s head with the tweezers, pull the tick straight out with a slow steady motion. Note that you should not be concerned if the head breaks off and remains attached to the skin, as disease transmission is impossible without the tick’s body.
  5. Disinfect Again: Once the tick is removed, disinfect the area again using rubbing alcohol.

Don’t buy into the myth that ticks can only be found in rural parts of Canada. You may even encounter them while on your urban Scouting adventures in areas such as parks and local greenspace.

TREATING LYME DISEASE

Early detection of Lyme Disease is important, but this can be tricky because symptoms can sometimes take weeks or even months to appear. So if you think you may have been exposed to the bacteria through a tick bite, or you experience symptoms, you should seek medical attention right away. Here are symptoms you should pay attention to:

  • Rash
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Numbness in face or limbs
  • Nausea
  • Jaw Pain
  • Burning Sensations
  • Light sensitivity
  • Red eyes
  • Muscle aches
  • Neck stiffness
  • Difficulty breathing or getting air
  • Anxiety
  • Muscle twitching
  • Bone or joint pain
  • Swollen lymph nodes

If you are experiencing a combination of these symptoms after exposure to ticks-bites, seek medical attention immediately! Early stage Lyme Disease can be treated with antibiotics, and the longer you wait to seek treatment, the harder it is to treat.

As I’m sure you’ve heard, tick populations this year are on the rise, and with that comes the rise in cases of Lyme Disease. It is important to remember that not every tick bite that takes place will result in a case Lyme Disease, but it is equally important to take precautions against ticks whenever possible. Continue to educate your Group and review tick and tick removal practices to help keep your adventures safe and fun.

As we always say, “Be Prepared.”

Source: TickEncounter.org

The post Does Lyme Disease Tick You Off? Me too! appeared first on Scouting Life.

Scouting Life: Woodbadge II on the Canadian Path

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/05/woodbadge-ii-canadian-path/ by Jeff Schroeder

Wood Badge training in Canada is broken down into two parts. Wood Badge I focuses on basic program facilitation knowledge and is usually accomplished through a form of eLearning. As you might imagine, Wood Badge II is “applied Wood Badge I.” Wood Badge II takes the skills learned in Wood Badge I and applies them against practical situations, with particular attention to basic outdoor and Volunteer-support skills.

Completing Wood Badge I has been a requirement for all Scouters, and it continues to be so. Wood Badge I was relatively easy to achieve because one could accomplish it on their own time through the eLearning package provided by Scouts Canada. Wood Badge II, however, required much more time and commitment: Scouters had to set aside a full week, or consecutive weekends, in order to complete the training which was done at Scouting retreats. As you can imagine, this meant that the number of Scouters who had accomplished Wood Badge I was very high, but by comparison those who had achieved Wood Badge II was quite low.

With the implementation of The Canadian Path, Scouts Canada has revised Wood Badge II training to remove the barriers that the time commitment of the previous training model created. Rather than requiring trainees to book time away from their busy schedules, families, and Scouting Groups to complete the training, the new model maps Wood Badge II over The Canadian Path. This makes it a self-directed program that can be completed at the trainee’s convenience, while continuing to offer the opportunity to learn “applied Wood Badge I skills.”

The new Wood Badge II training uses 26 Scouter Development Cards that are available in the Wood Badge II Guide for Section Scouters that is available through the link at the end of this article. Each card has been designed by Scouts Canada to focus on and provide resources for a specific skill relating to Outdoor Skills, Program Facilitation, and Volunteer Support. The basic anatomy of each card includes a description, learning objectives, Plan-Do-Review guidelines, safety notes, online resources, and tips and tricks. Scouters use these Development Cards for self-directed learning using the following eight steps:

  1. Choose a Wood Badge II Support Scouter
  2. Review the Scouter Development Cards and conduct a self-assessment
  3. Select any number of Scouter Development Cards
  4. Review the Learning Objectives of the cards you have chosen with your Support Scouter
  5. Create and implement a plan over the next program cycle
  6. Review your progress with your Support Scouter at the end of the program cycle
  7. Repeat steps 4 to 6 until you have completed all the Scouter Development Cards
  8. Submit your Wood Badge II application to your Council

As you can see, the new model of training is entirely self directed, although you will want to find a good Support Scouter to work with through your training. And important thing to keep in mind, however, is that the Support Scouter is not responsible for your training. They can provide feedback, are available to discuss and review your activities, and provide resources you may need to complete your Wood Badge II training. But the training is self-directed: it is your responsibility to complete everything necessary. That said, Support Scouters must meet Scouts Canada’s Volunteer screening requirements and must have completed their Wood Badge I training as well. So you can’t just pick anyone. It is also an excellent idea to have a good working relationship with whomever you pick as your Support Scouter. You should also make sure that your choice for Support Scouter has the time to work with you on the Wood Badge II program.

With the introduction of The Canadian Path, our Youth are expected, with support, to become more self-directed and take on more leadership roles as a result. But it shouldn’t stop at our Youth. Scouters should also be expected to take responsibility for their own learning and training as well. The updated Wood Badge II training reflects The Canadian Path to allow you to work with a Support Scouter and complete your training on your own time. Scouts Canada is excited about these changes, as it offers a greater opportunity for Scouters to obtain their Wood Badge II certification. For more detailed information regarding the new Wood Badge II training, you can Scouts.ca/WB2 and download guides both for Section Scouters and Support Scouters. Or you can contact our National Learning & Development Team Lead, Ross Benton, at ross.benton@scouts.ca.

The post Woodbadge II on the Canadian Path appeared first on Scouting Life.

Scouting Life: Scout Popcorn roadshow!

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/05/scout-popcorn-roadshow/ by Jeff Schroeder

Want some hands-on support when planning your campaign? Not sure how to prepare your Kick-Off? Want to walk through the Popcorn system? Trail’s End and Scouts Canada will be travelling across the country to help you make your Scout Popcorn fundraiser a success! See the locations and dates below. Would you like to register?

Register Here

Are the locations too far from you? We’ll be live streaming the seminars for you to follow along! You can find the links to follow along here.

City Date Location
St John’s, Newfoundland June 5th, 6:30PM-9PM Hampton Inn St John’s – 411 Stavanger Dr, St. John’s, NL A1A 0A1
Halifax, Nova Scotia June 6th, 6:30PM-9PM Hampton Inn Dartmouth – 65 Cromarty Dr, Dartmouth, NS B3B 0G2
Toronto, Ontario June 8th, 6:30PM-9PM Sheraton Parkway Hotel – 9005 Leslie St, Richmond Hill, ON L4B 1B2
Victoria, BC June 10th, 10AM-12PM Marriott Victoria Inner Harbour, 728 Humboldt Street, Victoria, B.C. V8W 3Z5
Vancouver, BC June 11th, 10AM-12PM Sheraton Vancouver Airport – 7551 Westminster Hwy, Richmond, BC V6X 1A3
Calgary, Alberta June 14th, 6:30PM-9PM Sheraton Suits Calgary Eau Claire – 255 Barclay Parade SW, Calgary, AB T2P 5C2
Edmonton, Alberta June 15th, 6:30PM-9PM Sheraton Edmonton South – 7230 Argyll Rd NW, Edmonton, AB T6C 4A6
Regina, Saskatchewan June 16th, 6:30PM-9PM Hilton – 1975 Broad St, Regina, SK S4P 1Y1
Ottawa, Ontario June 17th, 10AM-12PM Scouts Canada National Office – 1345 Baseline Road, Ottawa ON, K2C0A7
London, Ontario June 21st, 6:30PM-9PM Scouts Canada Western Ontario Service Centre – 531 Windermere Rd, London ON

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Scouting Life: To do a Good Turn Every Day…

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/05/to-do-a-good-turn-every-day/ by Jayne Robertson

A recap of the projects and power of Good Turn Week 2017

The first question I am asked in every interview and conversation about Good Turn Week is always “what is a good turn and what does it look like?” To address this query, I find it is easiest to simply point to the projects envisioned and brought to life by the Youth of Scouts Canada during Good Turn Week. Across Canada, from April 29th – May 7th, 2017, these projects not only strived to make the world a better place through small acts of kindness, but creatively and generously made a positive lasting impact on their communities.

Throughout Good Turn Week, Scouting Youth were encouraged to put their heads together and come up with ideas for good turns that would set an example for their communities. The Youth answered this challenge enthusiastically, initiating a range of projects that helped the homeless, the environment, less fortunate youth, and addressed many other issues our society faces.

Since the implementation of the Canadian Path has encouraged Scouters to foster a more youth-led program, many of the Good Turn Week projects were driven by Scouting participants and address what they see as an act of kindness in our modern world. With that in mind, it is awesome to see the generous and compassionate spirits of the Youth reflected in their planning and project choices, some of which were truly remarkable.

One of these fantastic projects was the Scouts’ Knit-a-Thon for those in need, which took place in Mississauga on April 30th. This initiative was created by a 1st Sandalwood Cub Scout who wanted to see her Group knit 100 scarves for people in their community in need of warm winter clothes. This was a unique and exciting project which highlights the growing youth awareness of homelessness and poverty fostered by Good Turn Week’s many events.

Another project that addressed the less fortunate in our communities was the Youth-to-Youth Caring Project, which was constructed by the 215th Strathcona’s Cub pack “A”, and was specifically centred on having the Cubs themselves build care packages to be distributed to less fortunate kids. The Cubs decided which issue they wanted to deal with and child poverty was their number one concern. I had the benefit of working with this Group and I know first hand how enthusiastic the Scouters and Youth were about this project. It was led by the Cubs from beginning to end, and the care packages they constructed will certainly make a difference in the lives of several young people in their city.

Some groups decided to work on helping not just other people, but the four-legged members of their community as well. The 23rd Elsie Roy Scout Group did this by having each section create care packages for their local pet foodbank, Charlie’s Foodbank. Donations included toys, food, and treats for dogs, cats, and other small animals whose humans need a little help to get them the things they need.

Other groups decided to go a different route and look at issues around the environment. One of these events was the Bee Houses for St. Albert. The entire 2nd St. Albert Scout Group implemented this initiative that built bee houses to improve the bee populations in their city and protect their local plant and insect life. It was led by all members of all ages. It was a large project that had all five sections working as a team to design, construct, and place the bee houses around the city.

These are only a few examples of the many Good Turn Week projects that took place across the country. To read about more of these inspiring Good Turn Week events, check out the website at Scouts.ca/goodturnweek, and social media platforms (#goodturnweek).

To really get a grasp on just how amazing the Good Turn Week events were this year, I would recommend that you look at the Scouts Canada Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook pages to see photographs and commentary on the projects. As Youth work on projects like tree planting and food drives, the smiles on the faces of Beavers, Cubs, and Scouts are bright and contagious.

Many of the good turns you can see include work with Scout Trees, our initiative to raise money and plant trees in deforested areas. The participation through Scout Trees is doubly powerful, as Youth can tackle tree planting and Good Turn Week at once, highlighting both projects in one big good turn towards the environment.

While the local Scout groups worked on individual projects, on a national level Scouts Canada worked tirelessly to promote these projects, emphasizing the fabulous job all the Youth and volunteers have done to make their good turns a success.  Youth Spokespeople helped with the promotions by giving interviews and working with programs to advertise the campaign, while creating their own regional good turn week initiatives.

Overall, Scouts Canada has really gone out of their way to make Good Turn Week 2017 something spectacular, spreading awareness on both a local and national stage. Through each act of kindness, the event instilled in Youth the drive to follow in the footsteps of Baden-Powell, who believed that we should all try to make the world a better place, one-step at a time.

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Call for Nominations – Scouts Canada Board of Governors

Fellow Scouters

I am writing on behalf of the National Nominating Committee to invite nominations for the National Board of Governors for 2017-2018.

We are seeking nominations for the positions of Chair and Vice-Chair – Strategic.  We are also potentially looking for new members (called Member-at-Large) for the Board of Governors, including at least one youth member.

The Chair of the Board shall act as chair of all meetings of the Board and all meetings of Scouts Canada’s Voting Members. Working closely with the National Key 3, the Chair plays an important leadership role as an Officer of the organization.

The Vice Chair of the Board – Strategic is responsible for the development of the strategic plan of the organization, and assists the Chair of the Board, and chairs the Board should the Chair of the Board be unable, for any reason, to carry out the responsibilities of that office.

Members-at-Large contribute to the overall effectiveness of the Board through participating actively in all aspects of Board business.  As defined in the Bylaw, the Board of Governors is responsible for ensuring that the organization adheres to its Mission and Principles and has a strong strategic direction to guide its activities.  The Board ensures that appropriate policies and procedures are in place to ensure appropriate fiscal and risk management. In addition, the Board ensures that an appropriate management team is in place to direct and oversee the activities of the organization.

For the at-large positions, the Board of Governors would especially welcome nominations of individuals with experience of expertise in one of the following areas:  development/fundraising, strategic human resources, property and asset management, law, and executive leadership.

Board members are expected to attend a minimum of four weekend meetings per year.  Board members also participate in committee work between board meetings.

For the above positions, you may submit your name for consideration or recommend others.  Each submission must be accompanied by a CV/resume and a written confirmation from the individual acknowledging that they are willing to serve and that they have an understanding of the position.  All submissions must be sent to Steve Kent, Chair of the National Nominating Committee (skent@scouts.ca) by midnight PST, June 30, 2017.

If you have any questions or concerns, please get in touch with me any time.  I can be reached at skent@scouts.ca.  Thanks!

Yours in Scouting

Steve

STEVE KENT

Past Chair – Board of Governors  |  Chair – National Nominating Committee  |  Canadian Head of Contingent – 24th World Scout Jamboree – 2019  |  Scouts Canada

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