This BLOG is maintained by the Council and its Areas – Burlington, Credit Hills, Mississauga, North Waterloo, Oakville, Wellington & Yellow Briar

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CEC Summer Nights 2017

Join us for a Summer Night at one of our CEC Scout Camps

Who: Active Scouts and their Immediate Family

Where:

Camp Everton

Wednesday

July 12, 2017

Blue Springs Scout Reserve

Wednesday

July 26, 2017

Camp Manitou

Wednesday

August 23, 2017

Time(s): About 7:00PM until dusk 9:00PM /dark 9:30P

Events: Arrive / Greet >> Hike / Activity(s) >> Campfire >> Mug Up* >> STEM star/ moon viewing

* Bring own mug (We’re leave no trace) & refreshment

Cost: Free (Yes, No charge)

Let us know you are coming @ cec_marketing@scouter.ca Info only NO REPLY(S)

Weather Permiting

Scouting Life: Woodbadge II on the Canadian Path

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/05/woodbadge-ii-canadian-path/ by Jeff Schroeder

Wood Badge training in Canada is broken down into two parts. Wood Badge I focuses on basic program facilitation knowledge and is usually accomplished through a form of eLearning. As you might imagine, Wood Badge II is “applied Wood Badge I.” Wood Badge II takes the skills learned in Wood Badge I and applies them against practical situations, with particular attention to basic outdoor and Volunteer-support skills.

Completing Wood Badge I has been a requirement for all Scouters, and it continues to be so. Wood Badge I was relatively easy to achieve because one could accomplish it on their own time through the eLearning package provided by Scouts Canada. Wood Badge II, however, required much more time and commitment: Scouters had to set aside a full week, or consecutive weekends, in order to complete the training which was done at Scouting retreats. As you can imagine, this meant that the number of Scouters who had accomplished Wood Badge I was very high, but by comparison those who had achieved Wood Badge II was quite low.

With the implementation of The Canadian Path, Scouts Canada has revised Wood Badge II training to remove the barriers that the time commitment of the previous training model created. Rather than requiring trainees to book time away from their busy schedules, families, and Scouting Groups to complete the training, the new model maps Wood Badge II over The Canadian Path. This makes it a self-directed program that can be completed at the trainee’s convenience, while continuing to offer the opportunity to learn “applied Wood Badge I skills.”

The new Wood Badge II training uses 26 Scouter Development Cards that are available in the Wood Badge II Guide for Section Scouters that is available through the link at the end of this article. Each card has been designed by Scouts Canada to focus on and provide resources for a specific skill relating to Outdoor Skills, Program Facilitation, and Volunteer Support. The basic anatomy of each card includes a description, learning objectives, Plan-Do-Review guidelines, safety notes, online resources, and tips and tricks. Scouters use these Development Cards for self-directed learning using the following eight steps:

  1. Choose a Wood Badge II Support Scouter
  2. Review the Scouter Development Cards and conduct a self-assessment
  3. Select any number of Scouter Development Cards
  4. Review the Learning Objectives of the cards you have chosen with your Support Scouter
  5. Create and implement a plan over the next program cycle
  6. Review your progress with your Support Scouter at the end of the program cycle
  7. Repeat steps 4 to 6 until you have completed all the Scouter Development Cards
  8. Submit your Wood Badge II application to your Council

As you can see, the new model of training is entirely self directed, although you will want to find a good Support Scouter to work with through your training. And important thing to keep in mind, however, is that the Support Scouter is not responsible for your training. They can provide feedback, are available to discuss and review your activities, and provide resources you may need to complete your Wood Badge II training. But the training is self-directed: it is your responsibility to complete everything necessary. That said, Support Scouters must meet Scouts Canada’s Volunteer screening requirements and must have completed their Wood Badge I training as well. So you can’t just pick anyone. It is also an excellent idea to have a good working relationship with whomever you pick as your Support Scouter. You should also make sure that your choice for Support Scouter has the time to work with you on the Wood Badge II program.

With the introduction of The Canadian Path, our Youth are expected, with support, to become more self-directed and take on more leadership roles as a result. But it shouldn’t stop at our Youth. Scouters should also be expected to take responsibility for their own learning and training as well. The updated Wood Badge II training reflects The Canadian Path to allow you to work with a Support Scouter and complete your training on your own time. Scouts Canada is excited about these changes, as it offers a greater opportunity for Scouters to obtain their Wood Badge II certification. For more detailed information regarding the new Wood Badge II training, you can Scouts.ca/WB2 and download guides both for Section Scouters and Support Scouters. Or you can contact our National Learning & Development Team Lead, Ross Benton, at ross.benton@scouts.ca.

The post Woodbadge II on the Canadian Path appeared first on Scouting Life.

Scouting Life: To do a Good Turn Every Day…

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/05/to-do-a-good-turn-every-day/ by Jayne Robertson

A recap of the projects and power of Good Turn Week 2017

The first question I am asked in every interview and conversation about Good Turn Week is always “what is a good turn and what does it look like?” To address this query, I find it is easiest to simply point to the projects envisioned and brought to life by the Youth of Scouts Canada during Good Turn Week. Across Canada, from April 29th – May 7th, 2017, these projects not only strived to make the world a better place through small acts of kindness, but creatively and generously made a positive lasting impact on their communities.

Throughout Good Turn Week, Scouting Youth were encouraged to put their heads together and come up with ideas for good turns that would set an example for their communities. The Youth answered this challenge enthusiastically, initiating a range of projects that helped the homeless, the environment, less fortunate youth, and addressed many other issues our society faces.

Since the implementation of the Canadian Path has encouraged Scouters to foster a more youth-led program, many of the Good Turn Week projects were driven by Scouting participants and address what they see as an act of kindness in our modern world. With that in mind, it is awesome to see the generous and compassionate spirits of the Youth reflected in their planning and project choices, some of which were truly remarkable.

One of these fantastic projects was the Scouts’ Knit-a-Thon for those in need, which took place in Mississauga on April 30th. This initiative was created by a 1st Sandalwood Cub Scout who wanted to see her Group knit 100 scarves for people in their community in need of warm winter clothes. This was a unique and exciting project which highlights the growing youth awareness of homelessness and poverty fostered by Good Turn Week’s many events.

Another project that addressed the less fortunate in our communities was the Youth-to-Youth Caring Project, which was constructed by the 215th Strathcona’s Cub pack “A”, and was specifically centred on having the Cubs themselves build care packages to be distributed to less fortunate kids. The Cubs decided which issue they wanted to deal with and child poverty was their number one concern. I had the benefit of working with this Group and I know first hand how enthusiastic the Scouters and Youth were about this project. It was led by the Cubs from beginning to end, and the care packages they constructed will certainly make a difference in the lives of several young people in their city.

Some groups decided to work on helping not just other people, but the four-legged members of their community as well. The 23rd Elsie Roy Scout Group did this by having each section create care packages for their local pet foodbank, Charlie’s Foodbank. Donations included toys, food, and treats for dogs, cats, and other small animals whose humans need a little help to get them the things they need.

Other groups decided to go a different route and look at issues around the environment. One of these events was the Bee Houses for St. Albert. The entire 2nd St. Albert Scout Group implemented this initiative that built bee houses to improve the bee populations in their city and protect their local plant and insect life. It was led by all members of all ages. It was a large project that had all five sections working as a team to design, construct, and place the bee houses around the city.

These are only a few examples of the many Good Turn Week projects that took place across the country. To read about more of these inspiring Good Turn Week events, check out the website at Scouts.ca/goodturnweek, and social media platforms (#goodturnweek).

To really get a grasp on just how amazing the Good Turn Week events were this year, I would recommend that you look at the Scouts Canada Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook pages to see photographs and commentary on the projects. As Youth work on projects like tree planting and food drives, the smiles on the faces of Beavers, Cubs, and Scouts are bright and contagious.

Many of the good turns you can see include work with Scout Trees, our initiative to raise money and plant trees in deforested areas. The participation through Scout Trees is doubly powerful, as Youth can tackle tree planting and Good Turn Week at once, highlighting both projects in one big good turn towards the environment.

While the local Scout groups worked on individual projects, on a national level Scouts Canada worked tirelessly to promote these projects, emphasizing the fabulous job all the Youth and volunteers have done to make their good turns a success.  Youth Spokespeople helped with the promotions by giving interviews and working with programs to advertise the campaign, while creating their own regional good turn week initiatives.

Overall, Scouts Canada has really gone out of their way to make Good Turn Week 2017 something spectacular, spreading awareness on both a local and national stage. Through each act of kindness, the event instilled in Youth the drive to follow in the footsteps of Baden-Powell, who believed that we should all try to make the world a better place, one-step at a time.

The post To do a Good Turn Every Day… appeared first on Scouting Life.

Fill out a Survey for STEM for a chance to Win!

It has been almost 4 years since Scouts Canada’s STEM program was launched at the Canadian Jamboree 2013 in Alberta. Over the past 4 years, the STEM team volunteers and staff have worked hard to create fun and exciting resources and opportunities for Scouting youth: Trail Cards and STEM kits that helps youth better experiment with the natural connections between Scouting and STEM and STEM station at various national and provincial Jamborees.

Now we need our Scouters’ feedback to see how the program is working and what we can do to make it better. Whether they are a STEM guru in their Scouting world, or have never heard of the program before; Whether they have used Scouts Canada’s STEM resources, or are hearing about them for the first time, we want to hear from them. And we want to ask you to promote the survey so that we can get as many responses as possible. Please distribute this link to the Scouters you work with and ask them to share their thoughts and feedback:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/P6XFNV5

As an added bonus, if they fill out the survey before May 7th, they will be entered into a draw to win a $50 Scout shop gift card. So there’s really no reason not to do it!

Bill Rice – Gone Home

We are saddened with the news today that Bill Rice, from Burlington Area, passed away this morning. A 35 year volunteer with Scouts Canada who was recently honoured with the Bar to the Silver Acorn and the Award of Fortitude for his battle with Cancer. Bill was a strong supporter and volunteer with The Canadian Blood Services and with Movember were Bill had raised over $30,000.00 to help with Men’s health issues.

Our thoughts and prayers are with Bill’s family.

Gone Home far to soon.

Sincerely,

Deanna DeVito – Central Escarpment Council Youth Commissioner
David Frederick – Central Escarpment Council Commissioner
Ian Foss- Executive Director Scouts Canada

2017 CEC Youth Recognition Ceremony – Date and Registration Details

The 2017 CEC Youth Recognition Ceremony will be on Sunday, June 11, 2017 at Sheridan College, 1400 Trafalgar Rd, Oakville, Ontario.

If you earned the Chief Scout, Queen’s Venturer or Canadian Rover Scout Award since May 2016 and would like to be included in this year’s Ceremony, please fill out and submit an application form

  • Download a copy –HERE
  • If you are a Canadian Rover Scout Award recipient, the form has not yet been updated to reflect this award.  Please indicate on the form (Add CANADIAN ROVER SCOUT AWARD).

Please send in the forms electronically by May 1, 2017 to Jen Austin (jenaustin@scouts.ca).

  • In the subject line, please specify “CEC Youth Recognition Ceremony Application – <Group Name> “
  • There is no need to send in the original form unless you do not have access to a computer.  In this case, please send the forms to the COSC (10 Kodiak Cr., Unit 120,  Toronto, ON , M3J 3G5),  and mark the envelope Attention: Jen Austin – CEC Youth Recognition Ceremony Application

Presentations for The North Star Award (Beavers) and The Seeonee Award (Cubs) will be done at the Group / Area level.

If there are any questions or issues, please contact our Council Youth Commissioner, Deanna Di Vito (deanna.divito@scouts.ca)

1st Ayr Beavers Science Beaver Badge

Written by Mark Hammar, DCC Program for Central Escarpment Council.

When my son Sam, who is a white tail at 1st Ayr, first got his beaver map he was immediately excited about the science beaver badge and wanted to work on it. In our family was all love science and have done some fun activities ourselves, and he thought that doing some experiments with dry ice would be fun for the beavers and everyone could learn something about safety in science and how much fun dry ice was.

Sam was very excited to share his knowledge about the subject, so here was how he did the Plan-Do-Review for the badge:

Plan

My son came up with a plan of what he wanted to do with the beavers so that they would learn and be safe. Here is the plan that I emailed to the scouters for “approval”:

  • Safety message with making the quarter scream
  • Demonstrate making a big bubble on a bowl of dry ice in hot water
  • Demonstrate making a bubble on the bottle after adding hot water and dry ice
  • Each beaver will get a bottle and can do step 2 on their own in supervised groups
  • In groups, they will get a chance to try to hold a bubble with soapy hands

Do

The night of the experiments went well.

  • Met at our regular meeting hall
  • Sam gave his safety talk (mostly, “don’t touch the dry ice”)
  • He and my wife did some demonstrations and then the beavers each got to do dry ice in a bottle to make bubbles. (supervised by an adult)
  • Each group of beavers got a chance to come up and try to hold a bubble by getting their hands soapy

See some of the photos from the night below (I actually remembered to take them this time) and you can see making bubbles in bottles, the big bubble on a bowl, trying to stick your finger into a bubble and more. Enjoy!

 

Review

  • We discussed as a group what they learned and some of the common answers were that they learned about how dry ice worked (it is frozen but is a gas at room temperature), as well as that they need to stay safe while doing experiments.
  • Discussions with Sam indicated that he thought it went well, but in the future, he would practice the speech he was planning to say as he worried he forgot something.

Overall it was a successful dry ice experiment night. Sam learned a bit about what it takes to be a leader for an activity, that it is important to keep everyone safe, and the preparation is important. The colony had a great time making smoke-filled bubbles and learning a bit about how chemicals work. There has been interest by other beavers into what they have to do to work on a badge of their own. I expect that we will soon see others come forward wanting to share information on a badge that interests them so that the colony can learn more.


Scouting Life: Start Dreaming Up Your Summer Adventures!

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/03/start-dreaming-summer-adventures/

Canadians are fortunate to experience the four seasons as sharp contrasts to each other. From the snowy depths of winter to the buds and blossoms of spring, to the sunny and stormy days of summer, to the spectacular colours of fall, every season offers a fresh opportunity to appreciate the beauty of nature.

Of course, the different seasons also offer a variety of opportunities for Scouting adventures! While it’s wonderful to hit the trail when the snow melts and wet a paddle when the ice breaks up, Canadians know that spring offers just a hint of what’s to come. There’s no season quite like summer for enjoying the outdoors!

Summer Adventure Week – the last week in March – is all about getting a jump on planning your great, safe, summer Scouting adventures! Now’s the time to give some thought to what adventures you’ll share this June, July and August. Summer’s a unique opportunity to dream a bit bigger. After all, Scouting youth are on holiday from school, so summer’s the perfect time to take an extra day or two (or three or four!) for an outdoor adventure.

It’s also worth appreciating that there are some adventures possible in the summer that really aren’t the same at other times of year. Sure, you can plan a day at the beach in the middle of winter and even build snow sculptures, but it’s not quite the same without a dip in the water! And while winter offers some of the clearest possible conditions for stargazing, there’s something wonderful about watching for shooting stars and not freezing your toes off.

When people think of Scouting, many think of fun outdoor activities like camping, hiking, swimming, sailing, paddling, cycling and horseback riding. Unfortunately, many Groups wind down their Scouting programs for the summer season. There are a variety of understandable reasons for this – for example, many families take vacation time in the summer, and both youth and Scouters may not have as much time free for Scouting as they do during the school year.

While there are certainly some obstacles to sharing Scouting adventures in the summer, the rewards are worth the trouble. Sharing summer adventures strengthens the friendships among youth in a Section – it is an opportunity to keep in touch with one another, and with Scouting. Youth who share summer Scouting adventures report a higher satisfaction with the program overall, and they are more likely to register for Scouting in the fall.

Summer Adventure Week is a celebration of a season that’s still months away. It’s time to start dreaming up and planning your summer Scouting adventures. The Summer Adventure webpage offers a wide variety of ideas for summer adventures for all Sections, in all parts of Canada. Check out the ideas – there may be something you want to try, or someplace you’d like to visit. You might settle on an adventure that’s not on the site, and that’s great too! Whatever you get up to this summer, we’d love to hear about it – #ScoutsDoStuff!

Have a great summer adventure!

The post Start Dreaming Up Your Summer Adventures! appeared first on Scouting Life.

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