This BLOG is maintained by the Council and its Areas – Burlington, Credit Hills, Mississauga, North Waterloo, Oakville, Wellington & Yellow Briar

5 Rover Scouts

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CEC Summer Nights – July 12th

Join us this Wednesday July 12th for a Summer Night at Camp Everton

Who: All active Scouts and their Immediate Family

Events: Arrive / Greet >> Hike / Activity(s) >> Campfire >> Mug Up* >> STEM star/ moon viewing Time(s): About 7:00 PM until dusk 9:00 PM /dark 9:30 PM

* Bring own mug (We’re leave no trace) & refreshment

Cost: Free (Yes, No charge)

Let us know you are coming @ cec_marketing@scouter.ca Info only NO REPLY(S)

Weather Permitting

WELLINGTON AREA SUMMER PROGRAMMING – SECTION SPECIFIC

Wellington Area is pleased to be able to offer summer programming to Groups in Central Escarpment Council.

Section events will take place at Barber Scout Camp and include a variety of Activities. Activities for Beavers, Cubs and Scouts require that the Youth bring a parent. Scouters at these events will be providing programming and will not be expected to supervise youth who attend.

BEAVER SCOUT SPECIFIC PROGRAMMING

When: August 9, 6:30pm
Where: Barber Scout Camp
Activity: 26th Scout Group will be providing an evening of activities for Beavers ending with a campfire. Come join us for a summer meeting and meet other Beavers in Wellington Area.

When: August 12, 9:30am to approximately 12:30
Where: Barber Scout Camp
Activity: Join Wellington Area Beavers and Crystal Allan from the Grand River Conservation Authority on an exploration of the Eramosa River to search for fish, crayfish and other aquatic creatures. You’ll help catch and identify several species of minnows and darters, learn how to tell the difference between male and female crayfish, and explore different river habitats to collect aquatic bugs.
Several nets and containers will be available however if you have a net or bug container please bring it along. Youth and parents will be in the water so appropriate footwear is required: closed-toed water shoes, rubber boots or old running shoes. A change of dry clothes and a towel is also highly recommended.

This activity will be limited to a maximum of 25 youth so reserve your spot early at wsummerprogram@gmail.com Put Beavers in the subject line.

CUB SCOUT SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES

When: August 14th, 7:00pm
Where: Barber Scout Camp
Activity: Join the 3rd Guelph Pack Team in an evening of activities and games designed for youth of Cub age. Bring your enthusiasm and be prepared to have a good time.

VENTURER SCOUT SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES

When: August 2nd, 7:00pm
Where: Barber Scout Camp
Activity: Area Adventure Team members Logan and Brad will be holding an evening of activities designed for Venturers. Come out and meet other Venturers who share your interest in Scouting. Please bring a mess kit and songs/skits/cheers.

 

WELLINGTON AREA SUMMER PROGRAMMING – ALL AGES

Wellington Area is pleased to be able to offer summer programming to Groups in Central Escarpment Council for members of all ages – from Beaver right through to the experienced Scouters.

Activities for Beavers, Cubs and Scouts require that the Youth bring a parent. Scouters at these events will be providing programming and will not be expected to supervise youth who attend.

PROGRAMMING FOR ALL AGES ACTIVITIES

In our “Programming for All Ages” events we have 3 events for registered youth of all ages.

HIKE WITH PETER JASPERS-FAYER

When: Saturday July 29th
Time: 1:30pm
Where: Meet at the Band shell Parking lot of Riverside Park
Activity: Join Peter as he leads a hike for all ages. Activities will incorporate some tree, wildflower and insect identification. Bring with you good Hiking footwear, Quick snacks, Water, Bug spray. We will need the assistance of additional Scouters if you are interested in helping us out, contact us and let us know you can lend a hand.

ROCKET CONSTRUCTION AND LAUNCHING WITH MATT PITMAN AND HIS 27TH GUELPH TEAM

When: Saturday August 19
Time: 9:00am to 4:00pm (approximately)
Where: Barber Scout Camp
Activity: On August 19th join Matt Pitman and his team for a day of constructing and launching your own rockets. There is a $15.00 cost for this activity to cover the cost of the rockets to anyone who wishes to build a rocket. There is no charge for Parents who are only there to help their child. We will provide you lunch. Numbers are limited so if you are interested in joining us please, reserve your spot at wsummerprogram@gmail.com and give us the name and email of those attending and how many of you will be building your own rocket. Please put ROCKETS in the subject line. Numbers will be limited and in order to order the rocket kits, registration will close August 1.

DECORATIVE AND FUNCITIONAL KNOTS WITH BENT ANDERSON


When: Tuesday August 22
Time: 7:00pm
Where: Cuscaro House, Barber Scout Camp
Activity: Our summer programing will culminate on August 22 with an evening of knots at Barber Scout Camp with Bent Anderson, a master of knots, who will show how to tie both functional and decorative knots. There is no cost for this event, all supplies will be provided.

 

Don’t forget to mark these events on your calendar and plan to join us. We are always in need of help so if you are interested in helping us make these events a success please contact me at the email below.

Youth Development Weekend – Coming Soon!

Save the date for the CEC Youth Development Weekend! Taking place October 14th and 15th at Blue Springs, there will be two great back-to-back youth development opportunities!

October 14th – Scoutcraft Outdoor Adventure Skills Workshop
This workshop will be an opportunity for any youth from Beaver Scouts to Rover Scouts to drop-in and develop their Scoutcraft skills. It doesn’t matter if you’ve never tied a reef knot before or if you’re a seasoned pro and can lash together a shelter in no time – this workshop will be a chance for every youth to learn something new!

October 15th – FLEX Training (New and Improved!)
FLEX is the leadership development course designed for Cub Scouts, and we’ve got a new updated program ready! FLEX is a for-youth, by-youth training program delivered by Venturer and Rover Scouts.

Stay tuned for more details, including registration information coming soon! If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Alexander Court (alex.court@scouts.ca).

We’re also looking for any youth and Scouters to help mentor some of the Scoutcraft skills, as well as Venturer and Rover Scouts interested in being facilitators for the FLEX Course. Please let us know if you’re interested!

Scouting Life: No Campsite, No Trails? No Problem!

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/06/no-campsite-no-trails-no-problem/ by Jeff Schroeder

I take a deep breath, and enjoy the fresh air as it passes into my lungs. I look around…I see the grass, the trees, and a bird flying from one tree to the next. Where am I? It might surprise you to hear that I am taking a walk around my neighbourhood.

Summer is a time when everyone wants to be outdoors. The great weather, the time off…it’s the perfect opportunity to go camping and hiking, or simply just enjoy the outdoors. But what if you don’t have access to these spaces?

That’s where I come in! Don’t fret, there are still many ways to connect with nature (even when you’re in the middle of a city). And if you’re not in the middle of the city, these tips can help you feel closer to the nature that’s right in your backyard.

Deanna Divito — Youth Spokesperson

#1: Channel your inner youth and visit a neighbourhood park or playground. Chances are you need to walk to this area, meaning you get some fresh air and new views. Once you’re there, why not have some fun and play on the playground? I promise, it never gets old.

#2: Take a walk on the wild side and go out at night instead of during the day. Once the temperatures start increasing, it can be a little hot to be outside in the daylight. Why not beat the heat and go for a night hike in your neighbourhood? See if you can find the moon or the stars (or maybe a passing airplane or satellite, if you’re lucky).

#3: Cultivate your green thumb by planting flowers, fruits, or vegetables. Pick your favourite, and get started by planting them inside your house. Move them outdoors when they grow just a wee bit bigger. No backyard? No problem! There are many plants that can be grown on balconies (one example is tomatoes. But feel free to do some research to discover the other plants you can grow!).

#4: Did someone say picnic? Take your lunch break outside one day, or grab some friends and food, and head to a nearby park for lunch one weekend. Think about it: friends, food, and fresh air… I know what I’m doing this upcoming weekend!

#5: Take your workout out of the gym and into the outdoors. Sometimes a change of scenery and some vitamin D can be refreshing and keep you motivated. Added bonus? You don’t have to wait for workout machines! Try it out sometime this summer, and who knows, you might enjoy exercising a little bit more than usual.

#6: Grab a pencil and a notebook, and observe the world around you. Contemplate why trees are green, or why you find that one flower so pretty. Try your hand at drawing, doodling, or journaling about what’s around you. Taking that step back from what’s happening in your life and reconnecting with nature can leave you refreshed and ready to face whatever happens next.

Summer time is truly a great time for adventures in the outdoors. Make sure to spend some time this summer finding nature in your own backyard.

And hey, if you try something on this list, or you have a great experience outdoors, share it on social media with the hashtag #FindYourNature and #ScoutsDoStuff. Tell us what your nature is.

Right now, my nature is having a picnic, so I’ll catch up with you after lunch!

The post No Campsite, No Trails? No Problem! appeared first on Scouting Life.

Scouting Life: Bug Bites and Stings

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/06/bug-bites-stings/ by Jayne Robertson

Scouts and Scouters like to be able to identify wildlife big and small when on adventures, but bugs can sometimes be more than simply annoying – they can pose real risks to our health and wellbeing. There are a number of bugs we might encounter that are hazardous, and it’s important to know how to avoid them.

Mosquitoes are all too familiar to Canadians. Mosquitoes can be more than simply aggravating. They can also carry West Nile virus, and too many bites can cause a dangerous allergic reaction. Wear long sleeves and bug repellant to deter mosquitoes when they’re out, especially around dusk.

Head Lice are tiny, tawny wingless insects that make their homes on people’s heads, living off human blood. Avoid head lice by not sharing hats or pillows. Keep your head apart from your friends’ – a little space when taking a selfie can make a big difference! Head lice will not go away without treatment, so visit a pharmacy for a special shampoo if you get lice.

Leeches usually aren’t dangerous, but they can carry disease. Leeches are usually found in warm, shallow, swampy water – which is just the habitat for all kinds of pathogens. A harmless-seeming bite can pose a risk. Remove leeches using a flat, blunt object (like the back of a knife) and then clean any wounds thoroughly.

Bees are found throughout Canada, and they play an important role in pollinating plants. Watch out for bees when you’re around flowers. If stung, clean the sting and remove the stinger with tweezers. Apply a cold compress. Some people are allergic to bees; an EpiPen could be a true lifesaver.

Ticks are tiny bugs that live off the blood of mammals and birds. Ticks are typically found in grassy, wooded areas or along shorelines and in parks – all the places Scouts like to go! To feed, ticks stick their heads into the skin of a host’s body and can remain there up to five days drinking blood. Ticks are known for spreading disease, like Lyme disease. If you have a tick, remove it carefully and deliberately with tweezers. To learn more, check out the safety tip all about ticks.

Wasps are stinging, flying insects (like bees), and you need to watch out for them. Hornets are part of the wasp family. If stung, clean the sting. Apply a cold compress. Some people are allergic to stings, and should use an EpiPen to prevent a life-threatening allergic shock

Spiders, though not insects, are often considered pests – even though they prey on insects that can be far more annoying, and even more dangerous. Spiders in Canada rarely bite, and they do not convey disease. Black widow spiders – which have a red hourglass marking on the stomach – are rare but present in Canada, and they are venomous. If bitten, remain calm. Apply an ice pack and seek medical attention. You can learn more about spiders in Canada at healthycanadians.gc.ca.

The post Bug Bites and Stings appeared first on Scouting Life.

Scouting Life: Does Lyme Disease Tick You Off? Me too!

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/06/lyme-disease-tick-off/ by Jeff Schroeder

Read here for prevention and treatment information

This year, as part of your preparations for summer adventures, make sure your Group includes a review of tick bite prevention, and takes the time to discuss Lyme disease. Ticks are a serious issue! Since we spend so much time outdoors on our adventures, there’s a good chance that we will be in areas where ticks live. Ticks can be found all across Canada, and their populations are becoming increasingly infected with bacteria called Borellia bergdorferi, which is what causes Lyme disease. And the ticks that can carry the disease are tiny — about the size of a poppy seed!

Here are a few tips that will keep you bite-free this summer:

  1. Wear boots so that you can tuck your pants into them. This will prevent ticks from climbing up your legs. For added protection you can spray whatever footwear you’re wearing with a 0.5% permethrin insecticide once a month.
  2. Spritz your clothes with the same permethrin spray. Remember though, that these clothes should be laundered separately — the spray can come off in the wash and mix with other clothing and you don’t want it on your everyday clothes, especially your underwear!
  3. Use a 20 to 30 percent DEET repellant on exposed skin. Look for one that has an EPA registration number, which means that there is information available on its effectiveness against ticks.
  4. Once you are home from your adventure, make sure that you wash the clothes you took with you in hot water, and then tumble dry on high heat for 60 minutes. The heat will kill any ticks that happen to be hanging out on your clothing. Don’t just throw your clothes into the hamper as any ticks on them could potentially cause problems for you or others in your household later.

Ticks especially enjoy grassy wooded areas and shorelines, so be extra cautious when taking your Group on a summer hike or a canoe trip.

If you are bitten by a tick, don’t panic! Not all ticks carry Lyme disease and it can take up to 36 hours for any bacterial infection to transfer. However, you will want to deal with the situation as quickly as possible. Here are the steps you need to know in order to remove them:

  1. Pointed Tweezers: You’ll want to have a pair of these in your kit. Household tweezers (which have flat ends) are less effective because ticks are tiny, and there are increased chances of tearing the tick.
  2. Disinfect the Area: Use rubbing alcohol to disinfect the tick-bite.
  3. Grab the Tick: Using a pointed tweezer, you should be able to grab the tick’s head or grab it directly above the head.
  4. Pull Out Tick: Once you’ve firmly grabbed the tick’s head with the tweezers, pull the tick straight out with a slow steady motion. Note that you should not be concerned if the head breaks off and remains attached to the skin, as disease transmission is impossible without the tick’s body.
  5. Disinfect Again: Once the tick is removed, disinfect the area again using rubbing alcohol.

Don’t buy into the myth that ticks can only be found in rural parts of Canada. You may even encounter them while on your urban Scouting adventures in areas such as parks and local greenspace.

TREATING LYME DISEASE

Early detection of Lyme Disease is important, but this can be tricky because symptoms can sometimes take weeks or even months to appear. So if you think you may have been exposed to the bacteria through a tick bite, or you experience symptoms, you should seek medical attention right away. Here are symptoms you should pay attention to:

  • Rash
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Numbness in face or limbs
  • Nausea
  • Jaw Pain
  • Burning Sensations
  • Light sensitivity
  • Red eyes
  • Muscle aches
  • Neck stiffness
  • Difficulty breathing or getting air
  • Anxiety
  • Muscle twitching
  • Bone or joint pain
  • Swollen lymph nodes

If you are experiencing a combination of these symptoms after exposure to ticks-bites, seek medical attention immediately! Early stage Lyme Disease can be treated with antibiotics, and the longer you wait to seek treatment, the harder it is to treat.

As I’m sure you’ve heard, tick populations this year are on the rise, and with that comes the rise in cases of Lyme Disease. It is important to remember that not every tick bite that takes place will result in a case Lyme Disease, but it is equally important to take precautions against ticks whenever possible. Continue to educate your Group and review tick and tick removal practices to help keep your adventures safe and fun.

As we always say, “Be Prepared.”

Source: TickEncounter.org

The post Does Lyme Disease Tick You Off? Me too! appeared first on Scouting Life.

Water for Life – Uganda 2017 Crests Still Available

There is still a limited number for Water for Life – Uganda 2017 crest still available for purchase. Price is $5 each and all proceeds will go to fund the projects in Uganda. Please contact Ted White at scouterted@thewhitefamily.ca if you are interested in purchasing.

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