This BLOG is maintained by the Council and its Areas – Burlington, Credit Hills, Mississauga, North Waterloo, Oakville, Wellington & Yellow Briar

4 Venturer Scouts

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CJ17 CEC Contingent Crest Orders

CEC is producing a crest for CJ’17.

A big congratulations to Callista Pitman, from 27th Guelph for the winning design.

We will be offering the crests in different border colours to represent each of the 7 areas.

Red – Burlington
Green – Credit Hills
Blue – Mississauga
Brown – North Waterloo
White – Oakville
Orange – Wellington
Yellow – Yellow Briar

The maximum crest cost will be $4.50, but will likely be lower once we know the final numbers.

If you would like to order some, please visit this page: https://form.jotform.ca/71364828714260

Because of the short timelines; all orders must be complete by June 1 so they can be ordered on June 2. I will arrange delivery once they have arrived.

If you are ordering some and are NOT attending CJ, please put that in the notes section so that I can prioritize crest delivery.

CEC Summer Nights 2017

Join us for a Summer Night at one of our CEC Scout Camps

Who: Active Scouts and their Immediate Family

Where:

Camp Everton

Wednesday

July 12, 2017

Blue Springs Scout Reserve

Wednesday

July 26, 2017

Camp Manitou

Wednesday

August 23, 2017

Time(s): About 7:00PM until dusk 9:00PM /dark 9:30P

Events: Arrive / Greet >> Hike / Activity(s) >> Campfire >> Mug Up* >> STEM star/ moon viewing

* Bring own mug (We’re leave no trace) & refreshment

Cost: Free (Yes, No charge)

Let us know you are coming @ cec_marketing@scouter.ca Info only NO REPLY(S)

Weather Permiting

Embrace the Chaos – a Flux in Time Fall Camp

From the program team of Embrace the Chaos – a Flux in Time

Camp registrations and Offers of Intent to Participate are now open! Please contact us at camps.npema@gmail.com with your information, questions or any concerns.

Cheques may be mailed to our group – address will be sent with receipt of your intent form completed. No cash please! We’re working to accept online payments as we speak!

The link to register your group’s intent to participant can be found here: https://goo.gl/forms/NJzeBTqTX8HitArj1

Offers of Service (OOS) registration forms: https://goo.gl/forms/MEmKWxjQ7gIxZuCu1

We’re always looking for more program staff, and site services and fire/police vents/rovers.

Everton Summer Camps 2017 – Now Hiring for Multiple Positions

Are you looking for a summer job? Do you love camping, working in the outdoors, and helping to deliver a fun-filled summer camp program for Cub and Scout aged youth?  Everton Summer Camps is now accepting applications for positions including Program Director, Head Cook, Kitchen Assistants, Lifeguards and Camp Counsellors.  If you are interested in applying for any of these positions, please see the below job descriptions for full details:

Program Director

Head Cook

Kitchen Assistant

Lifeguard

Camp Counsellor

Interested applicants should submit a resume and completed application (found here) to Camp Director Heather Bender (summercamp@scouter.ca) no later than May 28th, 2017.

We are also looking for volunteers interested in helping out with the first three weeks of camp (July 2nd-7th, July 9th-14th, and July 16th-21st). If you are available for any of these weeks and would be interested in volunteering, please send an email to summercamp@scouter.ca with your availability.  Volunteers would be working as Camp Counsellors (see job description for more information).

Scouting Life: Woodbadge II on the Canadian Path

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/05/woodbadge-ii-canadian-path/ by Jeff Schroeder

Wood Badge training in Canada is broken down into two parts. Wood Badge I focuses on basic program facilitation knowledge and is usually accomplished through a form of eLearning. As you might imagine, Wood Badge II is “applied Wood Badge I.” Wood Badge II takes the skills learned in Wood Badge I and applies them against practical situations, with particular attention to basic outdoor and Volunteer-support skills.

Completing Wood Badge I has been a requirement for all Scouters, and it continues to be so. Wood Badge I was relatively easy to achieve because one could accomplish it on their own time through the eLearning package provided by Scouts Canada. Wood Badge II, however, required much more time and commitment: Scouters had to set aside a full week, or consecutive weekends, in order to complete the training which was done at Scouting retreats. As you can imagine, this meant that the number of Scouters who had accomplished Wood Badge I was very high, but by comparison those who had achieved Wood Badge II was quite low.

With the implementation of The Canadian Path, Scouts Canada has revised Wood Badge II training to remove the barriers that the time commitment of the previous training model created. Rather than requiring trainees to book time away from their busy schedules, families, and Scouting Groups to complete the training, the new model maps Wood Badge II over The Canadian Path. This makes it a self-directed program that can be completed at the trainee’s convenience, while continuing to offer the opportunity to learn “applied Wood Badge I skills.”

The new Wood Badge II training uses 26 Scouter Development Cards that are available in the Wood Badge II Guide for Section Scouters that is available through the link at the end of this article. Each card has been designed by Scouts Canada to focus on and provide resources for a specific skill relating to Outdoor Skills, Program Facilitation, and Volunteer Support. The basic anatomy of each card includes a description, learning objectives, Plan-Do-Review guidelines, safety notes, online resources, and tips and tricks. Scouters use these Development Cards for self-directed learning using the following eight steps:

  1. Choose a Wood Badge II Support Scouter
  2. Review the Scouter Development Cards and conduct a self-assessment
  3. Select any number of Scouter Development Cards
  4. Review the Learning Objectives of the cards you have chosen with your Support Scouter
  5. Create and implement a plan over the next program cycle
  6. Review your progress with your Support Scouter at the end of the program cycle
  7. Repeat steps 4 to 6 until you have completed all the Scouter Development Cards
  8. Submit your Wood Badge II application to your Council

As you can see, the new model of training is entirely self directed, although you will want to find a good Support Scouter to work with through your training. And important thing to keep in mind, however, is that the Support Scouter is not responsible for your training. They can provide feedback, are available to discuss and review your activities, and provide resources you may need to complete your Wood Badge II training. But the training is self-directed: it is your responsibility to complete everything necessary. That said, Support Scouters must meet Scouts Canada’s Volunteer screening requirements and must have completed their Wood Badge I training as well. So you can’t just pick anyone. It is also an excellent idea to have a good working relationship with whomever you pick as your Support Scouter. You should also make sure that your choice for Support Scouter has the time to work with you on the Wood Badge II program.

With the introduction of The Canadian Path, our Youth are expected, with support, to become more self-directed and take on more leadership roles as a result. But it shouldn’t stop at our Youth. Scouters should also be expected to take responsibility for their own learning and training as well. The updated Wood Badge II training reflects The Canadian Path to allow you to work with a Support Scouter and complete your training on your own time. Scouts Canada is excited about these changes, as it offers a greater opportunity for Scouters to obtain their Wood Badge II certification. For more detailed information regarding the new Wood Badge II training, you can Scouts.ca/WB2 and download guides both for Section Scouters and Support Scouters. Or you can contact our National Learning & Development Team Lead, Ross Benton, at ross.benton@scouts.ca.

The post Woodbadge II on the Canadian Path appeared first on Scouting Life.

Scouting Life: 26th Halifax Scouts Win Engineering Design Competition

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/05/26th-halifax-scouts-win-engineering-design-competition/ by Jeff Schroeder

This year, the 26th Halifax Scout Troop in Nova Scotia took part in the Junior High Engineering Design Competition hosted by Engineering Nova Scotia. It was a fun and challenging afternoon, and it presented those who took part with an opportunity to be creative around current issues of climate change, and to design and engineer a safer and more resilient environment to live in. And I’m very pleased to announce that through the hard work and creative spirit of our Scouts, a team from the 26th took home first prize for their design.

The event took place at the Central Halifax Library on the 25th of March 2017, and it was a city-wide competition open to junior high aged youth. The teams that entered were given only vague details about the parameters of their design projects prior to the competition. Everyone knew that the theme of the competition had something to do with climate change, but that’s about it. Each team was given the parameters of what they were to design and engineer at the start of the competition, and everyone had an hour to complete their design.

The main idea was to build something (what that was wasn’t specified, it could be anything) that would prevent toxic waste from spilling out of a container during an earthquake. The toxic waste was represented during the competition by coloured water, and the container was represented by a cup. The teams were not allowed to cover the top of the cup as part of their design, and the top of the copy had to be at least 10cm above the surface of the table. Teams were also provided with a variety of materials they could incorporate into their design: elastic bands, BBQ skewers, tape, string, popsicle sticks, and pipe cleaners.  Each item provided was priced, and the teams were limited to a total budget of $150.  For instance, a popsicle stick would set the teams back $10, so you had to be “wise in the use of resources.”

26th Halifax Scout Group

At the end of the allotted hour, the designs were tested using an earthquake simulator provided by the organizers, and the designs were judged on their ability to keep the “toxic waste” from spilling, as well as taking into account the overall cost of the design and the team’s presentation (sales pitch) of their design.

As a Scouter, I was proud of our Scouts.  They understood the problem, worked together well as a team, and got a functional design working in an hour, under budget. In relation to the overall turnout for the event, this in and of itself was an accomplishment: most other teams weren’t able to complete their designs.

Our Scouts created a design that came out as a tripod – something our Scouts have built in real life at camps – so in many ways Scouting gave them the basis for a good STEM design. Our Scouts have also had some prior experience with design and build. As a Troop we have made really good use of the “Let’s Talk Science” outreach program offered by Dalhousie University (letstalkscience.ca). So pioneering, combined with some design/build experiences as well as some fine teamwork served our Scouts well. In addition to this, Ryan Greene, who was one of the Scouts on the team, is a National Youth Spokesperson. He did a great job “selling” the design to the judges. Yet another place where participation in Scouting helped.

26th Halifax Scout Group

We all had a great time and a ton of fun. Through the great work of our Scouts we received $100 towards our CJ’17 fund for winning. I’d encourage everyone in Nova Scotia to consider checking out future events hosted by Engineering Nova Scotia. They host events during March, which is National Engineering Month. Maybe we’ll see you next year at the Design Competition!

The post 26th Halifax Scouts Win Engineering Design Competition appeared first on Scouting Life.

Scouting Life: To do a Good Turn Every Day…

This was originally posted on the Scouting Life blog http://www.scoutinglife.ca/2017/05/to-do-a-good-turn-every-day/ by Jayne Robertson

A recap of the projects and power of Good Turn Week 2017

The first question I am asked in every interview and conversation about Good Turn Week is always “what is a good turn and what does it look like?” To address this query, I find it is easiest to simply point to the projects envisioned and brought to life by the Youth of Scouts Canada during Good Turn Week. Across Canada, from April 29th – May 7th, 2017, these projects not only strived to make the world a better place through small acts of kindness, but creatively and generously made a positive lasting impact on their communities.

Throughout Good Turn Week, Scouting Youth were encouraged to put their heads together and come up with ideas for good turns that would set an example for their communities. The Youth answered this challenge enthusiastically, initiating a range of projects that helped the homeless, the environment, less fortunate youth, and addressed many other issues our society faces.

Since the implementation of the Canadian Path has encouraged Scouters to foster a more youth-led program, many of the Good Turn Week projects were driven by Scouting participants and address what they see as an act of kindness in our modern world. With that in mind, it is awesome to see the generous and compassionate spirits of the Youth reflected in their planning and project choices, some of which were truly remarkable.

One of these fantastic projects was the Scouts’ Knit-a-Thon for those in need, which took place in Mississauga on April 30th. This initiative was created by a 1st Sandalwood Cub Scout who wanted to see her Group knit 100 scarves for people in their community in need of warm winter clothes. This was a unique and exciting project which highlights the growing youth awareness of homelessness and poverty fostered by Good Turn Week’s many events.

Another project that addressed the less fortunate in our communities was the Youth-to-Youth Caring Project, which was constructed by the 215th Strathcona’s Cub pack “A”, and was specifically centred on having the Cubs themselves build care packages to be distributed to less fortunate kids. The Cubs decided which issue they wanted to deal with and child poverty was their number one concern. I had the benefit of working with this Group and I know first hand how enthusiastic the Scouters and Youth were about this project. It was led by the Cubs from beginning to end, and the care packages they constructed will certainly make a difference in the lives of several young people in their city.

Some groups decided to work on helping not just other people, but the four-legged members of their community as well. The 23rd Elsie Roy Scout Group did this by having each section create care packages for their local pet foodbank, Charlie’s Foodbank. Donations included toys, food, and treats for dogs, cats, and other small animals whose humans need a little help to get them the things they need.

Other groups decided to go a different route and look at issues around the environment. One of these events was the Bee Houses for St. Albert. The entire 2nd St. Albert Scout Group implemented this initiative that built bee houses to improve the bee populations in their city and protect their local plant and insect life. It was led by all members of all ages. It was a large project that had all five sections working as a team to design, construct, and place the bee houses around the city.

These are only a few examples of the many Good Turn Week projects that took place across the country. To read about more of these inspiring Good Turn Week events, check out the website at Scouts.ca/goodturnweek, and social media platforms (#goodturnweek).

To really get a grasp on just how amazing the Good Turn Week events were this year, I would recommend that you look at the Scouts Canada Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook pages to see photographs and commentary on the projects. As Youth work on projects like tree planting and food drives, the smiles on the faces of Beavers, Cubs, and Scouts are bright and contagious.

Many of the good turns you can see include work with Scout Trees, our initiative to raise money and plant trees in deforested areas. The participation through Scout Trees is doubly powerful, as Youth can tackle tree planting and Good Turn Week at once, highlighting both projects in one big good turn towards the environment.

While the local Scout groups worked on individual projects, on a national level Scouts Canada worked tirelessly to promote these projects, emphasizing the fabulous job all the Youth and volunteers have done to make their good turns a success.  Youth Spokespeople helped with the promotions by giving interviews and working with programs to advertise the campaign, while creating their own regional good turn week initiatives.

Overall, Scouts Canada has really gone out of their way to make Good Turn Week 2017 something spectacular, spreading awareness on both a local and national stage. Through each act of kindness, the event instilled in Youth the drive to follow in the footsteps of Baden-Powell, who believed that we should all try to make the world a better place, one-step at a time.

The post To do a Good Turn Every Day… appeared first on Scouting Life.

Fill out a Survey for STEM for a chance to Win!

It has been almost 4 years since Scouts Canada’s STEM program was launched at the Canadian Jamboree 2013 in Alberta. Over the past 4 years, the STEM team volunteers and staff have worked hard to create fun and exciting resources and opportunities for Scouting youth: Trail Cards and STEM kits that helps youth better experiment with the natural connections between Scouting and STEM and STEM station at various national and provincial Jamborees.

Now we need our Scouters’ feedback to see how the program is working and what we can do to make it better. Whether they are a STEM guru in their Scouting world, or have never heard of the program before; Whether they have used Scouts Canada’s STEM resources, or are hearing about them for the first time, we want to hear from them. And we want to ask you to promote the survey so that we can get as many responses as possible. Please distribute this link to the Scouters you work with and ask them to share their thoughts and feedback:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/P6XFNV5

As an added bonus, if they fill out the survey before May 7th, they will be entered into a draw to win a $50 Scout shop gift card. So there’s really no reason not to do it!

Mississauga Area Haliburton Composite Camp: JULY 29 – AUG 5 2017

Scouts and Venturers, it’s time to start planning your summer activities!!! Once again a few Scouters are getting together to help you plan some of your summer time fun by organizing a Mississauga Areas Composite Camp at the Haliburton Scout Reserve. You may ask yourself why you should attend the camp. Well here are some of the reasons:

The Haliburton Scout Reserve A Paradise for Scouts of all ages located 250 km (150 miles) north of Toronto, this 5000 acre reserve is richly forested and has 10 sparkling lakes providing wilderness homes for many animals, birds and fish. The Reserve is the largest Scout Camp in Canada and the summer home to countless thousands of Scouts, Venturer Scouts, and Scouters from all over Canada, the United States, Britain and many other countries.

The Activities

Weather permitting, the camp activities include:
  • Archery
  • Riflery
  • Rappelling
  • Sailing
  • Survival Island
  • Kayaking
  • Snorkeling
  • Climbing Wall

New this year for Venturers

We will be letting the Venturer aged youth camp, cook, and clean on their own, and take part in the activities of their choice. We will all be on the same campsite but the Venturers will be separate from the Scouts. There is an opportunity for the Venturers to do some hikes and other off camp activities by themselves.

Mandatory Pre-Camp meeting

There will be a mandatory Pre-Camp meeting held in Mississauga in June. Space is limited and registration is held on a first-come-first-served basis.

Registration

Register as soon as possible to avoid disappointment.  Camp fees include bus transportation to and from camp (Applewood Heights Secondary School).   See the following registration form for more information and to register.
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